Tag Archives: cfat

New Round of Grant Funds Available Through CFAT Project

For Immediate Release

Media Contact: Shannon Helm, 919-423-8340, shannon_helm@ncsu.edu

Project Contact: Rick Sapienza, 919-515-2788, resapienza@ncsu.edu

New Round of Grant Funds Available Through Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project

Over $1,400,000 to be awarded for transportation-related emission reductions

Raleigh, N.C. (January 8, 2020) – The North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) at North Carolina State University announces the following request for proposals (RFP) through the 2020 Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) project. The 2020 initiative will offer $1.4 million, focused on reducing transportation-related emissions, and supported with federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality funding from the N.C. Department of Transportation (DOT). The primary purpose of the CFAT project is to reduce transportation-related emissions in 24 eligible North Carolina counties.

Project proposals will be limited, none higher than $400,000 and none lower than $5,000. Applications will be due Friday, March 13, 2020. This will likely be the only solicitation for 2020. Learn more here.

Projects located in the following counties are eligible for CFAT funding: Cabarrus, Catawba, *Chatham, Davidson, Davie, Durham, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Franklin, Gaston, Granville, Guilford, *Haywood, *Iredell, Johnston, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, Nash, Orange, Person, Rowan, *Swain, Union, Wake, (*Represents partial counties). Projects for electric vehicle charging stations (EVSE) will be accepted within all 100 counties.

Available funds: $1,400,000

Maximum per project award: $400,000

Minimum per project award: $5,000

Application deadline: March 13, 2020

Project period: September 14, 2020 – September 30, 2021

Click here for the 2020 CFAT Request for Proposals

Click here for the CFAT RFP FAQs

Click here for the 2020 CFAT RFP Application

NOTE: Applications should be emailed to Rick Sapienza, resapienza@ncsu.edu.

A tax incentive is now available for alternative fuel that is sold for use or used as a fuel to operate a motor vehicle, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. A tax credit in the amount of $0.50 per gallon is available for the following alternative fuels: natural gas, liquefied hydrogen, propane, P-Series fuel, liquid fuel derived from coal through the Fischer-Tropsch process, and compressed or liquefied gas derived from biomass. Click here for more information.

NCCETC will host a CFAT 2020 Round 1 Informational Webinar from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, January 13, 2020. The free webinar will present an overview of eligible projects and have Q&A to assist with application submission. Learn more and register for the webinar here.

View examples of prior successful CFAT project proposals in 2018 and 2019.

 

ABOUT THE N.C. CLEAN ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CENTER

The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University, advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, sustainable energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information about the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, visit: http://www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu. Twitter: @NCCleanTech

Posted by Nicole Deck & John Bonitz

CFAT Project Deployed $2.8 Million in Funding for 22 Projects in 2019

On January 8, the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) announced the 2020 availability of grant funds through the Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project. This current round will offer $1.4 million in support of clean transportation and alternative fuels projects. Learn more here.

In 2019, the CFAT project deployed $2.8 million in federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality funding from the N.C. Department of Transportation (DOT). Those funds stimulated 22 projects by a variety of public and private entities, all focused on reducing transportation-related air pollution emissions.

The 2019 projects included:

• Three propane conversations projects

• 11 electric vehicle charging station projects

• Six electric vehicles projects (five motorcycles, one PHEV)

• Two diesel locomotive upfit projects to reduce emissions

• One hybrid electric upfit project

• Three idle reduction projects (two ePTOs and one ZeroRPM).

In total, the awarded equipment is expected to displace 1.2 million gallons of diesel and gasoline per year and reduce air pollution emissions by 1,200 kilograms per day.

The electric vehicles and EV charging infrastructure projects help  North Carolina reach the goals set by Governor Roy Cooper’s Executive Order 80 (EO80). With regard to transportation, EO80 urges the State of North Carolina to protect its environment while growing clean energy technologies, calling for a goal of 80,000 zero-emission vehicles (“ZEVs”, including electric vehicles) by year 2025.  The 11 electric vehicle charging station projects will make available 53 new Level 2 EV charging plugs (28 of which are replacements of defunct equipment), 16 solar-powered EV charging plugs and four new DC Fast Charge plugs (at two stations).

Learn more about each CFAT project below:

Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College (AB Tech)

This 2015 photo shows AB Tech’s EV charging ports, all of which are being replaced or upgraded this year. Source: https://www.abtech.edu/news/a-b-tech-opens-electric-vehicle-charging-station

 

Project: Two Level 2 chargers and one DC Fast charger on a community college campus near Asheville

In 2015, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College (A-B Tech) installed three EV charging ports in partnership with Nissan, Land of Sky Clean Fuels Coalition, Duke Energy and EATON. One of the Level 2 chargers and the DC Fast are inoperable, and the remaining Level 2 station is frequently down. With funds from this project, A-B Tech will work with one of three state-approved contractors to upgrade and replace two BTC Power Dual Port 30A-2p L2 Pedestal mounted EV Charging Stations and one BTCPower single port 50kW DC Fast Charger.

 

Accesso 

Source: https://apnews.com/ACCESSWIRE/ab6b1c9e9ad6f256ec914a0a1aa75620 / Accesswire / Envision Solar International, Inc., (NASDAQ: EVSI, EVSIW) (“Envision Solar,” or the “Company”), the leading producer of unique and sustainable infrastructure products for electric vehicle charging.

 

Project: Three solar-powered L2 chargers with two plugs each

Accesso owns and manages 10 commercial properties and managers of the Meridian Business Park Owners Association. Accesso will purchase three dual-port solar EV Chargers and expand local awareness on the availability and benefits of alternative fuel technologies and the benefits of reducing regulated emissions. The company’s plan is to place the three solar EV Chargers as equidistant as possible on the campus for the convenience of the tenants, residents and hotel guests.

 

Blackwell Street Management Company

Source: https://americantobaccocampus.com/about/47

 

Project: Two L2 EV chargers serving three spaces in a parking deck

Blackwell Street Management Company will replace, own and operate two inoperable Electric Vehicle Charging Stations on Julian Carr Street in Durham, NC. These are Level 2 stations that will serve every passenger vehicle available on the market. The stations will be located in a public access area close to amenities such as shopping, work, and other attractions. The stations are available to drivers via the most downloaded EV app in the country, and communicates status, availability, and any charges associated with use of the station to drivers. Additionally, the stations have the ability to collect and store utility-grade data for reporting purposes.

 

City of Charlotte Engineering Department

Example of an EV ARC. Source: http://cleantechsandiego.org/envision-solar-receives-order-silicon-valley-search-engine-20-ev-arc-solar-powered-electric-vehicle-charging-stations/

 

Project: Four solar-powered L2 EV chargers with two plugs each

City of Charlotte Engineering’s four EV Arc units are able to be deployed anywhere and will be moved to locations that need them most. They will be housed at the Fire Station Headquarters at 500 Dalton Ave Charlotte, NC. This is partly toward fulfillment of City of Charlotte’s Climate Action Plan, and not only does it shift away from fossil fuels, it also increases community resilience, due to the fact that these units can operate off-grid even during natural disasters that disrupt grid electricity.

 

City of Charlotte Water Department

Project: Twenty-five bi-fuel upfits to allow gasoline trucks to run on propane

Charlotte Water will install AutoGas propane conversion kits in 25 gasoline-powered Ford F-150s to lower emissions and its overall carbon footprint. Most of the units are driven by the Customer Service division and log numerous miles throughout the Charlotte metro area. This project will cost $145,000, which includes a 24 percent cost-share of $34,800. The shift from gasoline to propane will result in approximately 10 percent lower CO2 emissions.

 

City of Durham

Project: One electric PTO for a bucket lift truck

City of Durham will upfit one existing high-use bucket truck vehicle presently in operation with a product called SmartPTO manufactured by Viatec. This technology aids in the reduction of truck idle time, significantly reducing vehicle emissions.

 

City of Greensboro

Example of an EV ARC L2 solar-powered charging station. Source: https://www.envisionsolar.com/

 

Project: Two solar-powered L2 EV chargers with two plugs each

The City of Greensboro will be purchasing two Electric Vehicle Autonomous Renewable Chargers (EV ARC), to be deployed in parking lots located around the City’s governmental center for use by the public. These chargers are transportable and completely solar powered.

 

Cone Health

Project: Four L2 EVSE with 2 plugs each

Cone Health will install four CT4000 level 2 electric vehicle-charging stations from Chargepoint that may be utilized for public charging of environmentally friendly electric vehicles. The scope of the project will include purchasing and installing Level 2 charging stations at the Wesley Long campus of Cone Health, located at 2400 W. Friendly Avenue Greensboro, NC. The charging stations will be installed on the lower level of the existing parking garage located on the southwest portion of the campus.

 

Durham County

Project: Nine L2 EVSE with two plugs each

Durham County will purchase nine Level 2 dual-port EVSEs to replace nine single-port stranded EVSEs at four public locations. Stations will be free and open to the public 24/7. This will double the charging potential of these locations, as well as get them back in service. Learn more here.

 

Greenwood RRST Propane Autogas

Source: http://www.greenwoodrrst.com/autogas.html

 

Project: Twenty-five bi-fuel upfits to allow gasoline trucks to run on propane

Greenwood RRST will acquire the Prins autogas systems from Alliance Autogas. Greenwood RRST will oversee the installation of each system to each of the 25 SE&M fleet vehicles, and perform the system installations on SE&M vehicles. Greenwood RRST will provide onsite fueling at the SE&M headquarters (6441 NC-97 Elm City, NC).

 

MEDIC Mecklenburg EMS

Source: https://www.medic911.com/about-medic

 

Project: Twenty-two idle reduction devices to be installed on ambulances –  two will also be equipped with solar panels on top of the vehicles

Mecklenburg EMS Agency (MEDIC) was granted $400,000 from the Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) program to upfit 22 existing Dodge 5500 Ambulances with Idle Reduction Technology manufactured by Zero RPM, Cullman Alabama, and demonstrate on two ambulances the use of Go Power solar panels provided by Zero RPM.

 

North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) Rail Division

Source: https://www.ncdot.gov/Pages/default.aspx

 

Project: Two BATS emissions reduction systems for diesel-electric locomotive engine

The North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) will install two BATS emissions reduction systems for two more diesel-electric locomotives.

 

NC Propane Gas Association (NCPGA)

Project: Six propane bi-fuel systems

ICOM Alternative Fuel Systems installed propane bi-fuel on six vehicles that will be deployed with propane distributors. The six vehicles in four different air quality maintenance counties will be new vehicles expanding their current LPG fleets. One of the vehicles is a Bobtail used to deliver propane to customers in their assigned air quality maintenance county. The other five are service vehicles that will be used to install tanks and perform service work in their assigned air quality maintenance counties. ICOM is estimating that propane companies will use propane as the primary fuel 95 percent of the time for their 21 bi-fuel service trucks and 100 percent of the time for the dedicated Bobtail going to Quality Propane.

 

Orange County, NC

Project: Electric vehicle lease, one new solar-powered EV charger (two plugs), and replacement of twelve non-functioning EVSE

Orange County will complete a three-part project including; 1.) Upgrading a vehicle lease to a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) which will be available for use by all Orange County staff through the CarShare program managed by Orange County Asset Management Services, and; 2.) Renewing much of Orange County’s public charging network by replacing 12 failing, increasingly incompatible, and irreparable EATON charging stations with 12 updated single-plug EV charging stations, and; 3.) Acquiring a standalone solar-powered EV charging station that will fully charge three PHEV minivans operated by Orange County Public Transportation to serve as ADA-accessible On-Demand Transit vehicles for urban and rural residents. These vehicles will be stationed in a sunny parking lot that is far from an existing grid connection. These projects all support Orange County’s transition to 100 percent renewable energy-based operations by 2050.

 

Person County

Part of the Person County Museum of History

 

Project: One EVSE, two plugs

Person County Government will install a Level 2, single port Electric Vehicle Charging Station on the Person County Museum of History’s grounds, which is owned by the County. The Museum is located in Uptown Roxboro and will be the first public EV charging station in Person County.

 

Pine Shore Energy

Project: One DC Fast charger

Pine Shore Energy will be installing one DC Fast Charger at 131 Fayetteville St., Winston-Salem, NC.

 

 

 

Town of Pineville Police

Source: https://www.zeromotorcycles.com/fleet/police/

 

Project: Two electric motorcycles

The Pineville Police Department will purchase and deploy two Zero Electric Motorcycles for patrols, events and normal police operations.

 

Town of Cary

Cary Town Hall

 

Project: One electric PTO for a bucket lift truck; and one 2-plug L2 EVSE for Town Hall

The Town of Cary will complete two projects: 1) Viatec SmartPTO auxiliary power for a bucket truck, allowing the truck to halt its diesel engine while the arm is operating on job sites; and 2) One ChargePoint electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) dual-port unit at Town Hall. The SmartPTO auxiliary power will operate at job sites within Cary, NC, and the EVSE will be installed at the Cary Town Hall. Cary’s Strategic Energy Action Plan (2012 and 2015) states that the Town will reduce fuel use and diversify fuel types. The Viatec SmartPTO project allows Cary to test auxiliary power for use on a bucket truck. The EVSE will allow the Town of Cary to not only consider adding more electric vehicles to its fleet, but will also provide citizens and visitors electric vehicle charging infrastructure to alleviate range anxiety. This will likely lead to additional replacements of internal combustion engine vehicles in the area.

 

Town of Mint Hill

Project: One electric motorcycle

The Mint Hill Police Department plans to begin a community outreach program that will allow Mint Hill to work toward its mission of reducing crime while providing an exceptional level of service to its citizens. The use of an electric motorcycle provides the Police Department the ability to reach citizens in an efficient, environmentally conscious way, responding to and patrolling areas that conventional vehicles cannot access. An electric motorcycle will allow Mint Hill to promote zero-emission safety and protection to pedestrians, cyclists and others within the town and surrounding areas.

 

City of Greensboro Police Department

Two different models of Zero motorcycles. The units being deployed in law enforcement are up-fitted with police lights, radios, sirens, and other gear needed for the job.

 

Project: Two electric motorcycles

The Greensboro Police Department, in conjunction with the City of Greensboro, will incorporate two additional Zero Motorcycles into its fleet to patrol and respond to calls for service – in the Downtown Center City district, the Greenway, and other areas as needed – to decrease gasoline use, curb emissions, and to promote green technology programs of the City. The two electric motorcycles will be used in place of two 2014 Ford Crown Victoria sedans.

 

UNC Charlotte

Neighborhood electric vehicles in UNC Charlotte’s fleet

 

Project: One electric hybrid upfit to a gasoline vehicle

The University of North Carolina Charlotte (UNC Charlotte) in Mecklenburg County will conduct one hybrid electric conversion on a light duty truck, to reduce emissions per mile. This work will allow the campus to build on its successful fleet hybrid electrification that began as part of the State Petroleum Displacement program, which includes a fleet of over 100 GEM electric vehicles and awards for maximizing the use of E-85 in flex-fuel vehicles. The up-fit will convert one new F-250 truck to an XL Hybrid setup. XL Hybrids adds an electric motor, an advanced lithium ion battery pack, and sophisticated control software to the vehicle – without making significant modifications to the original internal combustion engine or transmission. The parallel hybrid system saves fuel by using a regenerative braking system to charge the battery. The battery then releases the energy to the electric motor, helping propel the vehicle when drivers accelerate. The proprietary controls make the electric motor assist smooth and seamless to the driver and passengers.

CFAT summaries

 

A tax incentive is now available for alternative fuel that is sold for use or used as a fuel to operate a motor vehicle, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. A tax credit in the amount of $0.50 per gallon is available for the following alternative fuels: natural gas, liquefied hydrogen, propane, P-Series fuel, liquid fuel derived from coal through the Fischer-Tropsch process, and compressed or liquefied gas derived from biomass. Click here for more information.

Take advantage of CFAT funding!

NCCETC will conduct a CFAT 2020 Round 1 Informational Webinar from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, January 13, 2020. The free webinar will present an overview of eligible projects and have Q&A to assist with application submission. Learn more and register for the webinar here.

For more information about the CFAT program, click here.

Posted by Nicole Deck & John Bonitz

How to Fund Electric Vehicle Charging Stations in North Carolina

An Energica electric motorcycle charging with a ChargePoint DC Fast Charger in Wallace, NC. – Photo by Chris Maxwell

Are you interested in installing new Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) (electric vehicle charging stations) in your North Carolina community? There are three possible sources of funding to make it happen.

EVSE; an element in an infrastructure that supplies electric energy for recharging of plug-in electric vehicles including electric cars, neighborhood electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids; is deployed throughout the country in key areas for public charging as a supplement to residential charging, according to the US Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center.

There are three types of electric vehicle chargers – Level 1, Level 2 and DC Fast Charging. Types are classified by the rate at which the batteries are charged. Level 1 provides 2-5 miles of range per 1 hour of charging, Level 2 provides 10-20 miles of range per 1 hour of charging, and DC Fast Charging provides 60-80 miles of range per 20 minutes of charging. Learn more about each type of equipment and developing infrastructure to charge plug-in electric vehicles at the US Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center website here. You can also view the current map of EV chargers in the United States and Canada here.

There are three potential sources of funds to support installation of EVSE in North Carolina:

1. The VW Settlement gives North Carolina $92 million dollars for projects to reduce vehicular air pollution. These funds will be administered by NC DEQ as a part of their beneficiary mitigation plan. Fifteen percent of these funds will be allotted for EVSE (both Level 2 and DC Fast Chargers).

The NCDEQ just released a Request For Proposals (RFP) for VW settlement funds for DC Fast chargers this week. Under the DC Fast Charge program:

• $3.4 million will be available for the installation of Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Charging Infrastructure

• Projects in designated corridors will receive priority to expand the state’s charging infrastructure network

• Projects can be submitted by eligible businesses, incorporated nonprofits, and state, local, tribal or municipal government agencies

Applications will be available on July 1, 2019, and the submission deadline is September 30, 2019. The Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Level 2 Charging program RFP will be released at a later date. Read more about the NCDEQ RFPs here.

2. The NC Clean Energy Technology Center’s Clean Transportation team also has limited grant funding for EVSE. The next Clean Fuels Advanced Technology (CFAT) project RFP will be released in the fall or winter of 2019. Funding will be restricted to projects where there is no ground disturbance involved (such as in a parking deck or where wires and conduit are already in place) – and no digging, trenching, pavement cutting, repaving, etc. is allowed. Take a look at the last round of funding for insights on what the next round may look like, and join the newsletter list to know when the next RFP will be issued by going here. For more information on CFAT funding, contact John Bonitz at jhbonitz@ncsu.edu.

A Hyundai Ioniq EV charging in Hillsborough, NC. Photo By Chris Maxwell

3. Duke Energy plans to invest $76 million to help spur EV adoption across the state, according to Duke Energy. Duke Energy’s proposal to the NC Utilities Commission would help fund the adoption of electric school buses and electric public transportation, and lead to almost 2,500 new charging stations in the state – more than doubling the amount of public stations currently in North Carolina, according to Duke Energy. The initiative is to help meet Gov. Roy Cooper’s executive order goals of having 80,000 electric vehicles registered in the state and to reduce the state’s carbon footprint by 40 percent below 2005 levels within the next six years. Duke Energy’s plan includes:

• Residential EV Charging: This program will provide a $1,000 rebate for qualifying Level II charging stations for up to 800 residential customers. Level II charging allows customers to charge their EVs up to six times faster than a standard wall outlet.

• Public Charging: Duke Energy will install and operate more than 800 public charging stations across North Carolina, including DC Fast Charging, Public Level II and multifamily locations, which will expand the state’s network of EV charging stations.

• Fleet EV Charging: The program will provide a $2,500 rebate for 900 qualifying charging stations for commercial and industrial customers who operate fleets that are transitioning to electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. Municipalities and universities also qualify for these rebates.

• EV School Bus Charging Station: Duke Energy will provide financial support to eligible customers to procure up to 85 electric school buses. Duke Energy will install the associated charging infrastructure.

• EV Transit Bus Charging Station: Duke Energy will install and operate more than 100 electric transit bus charging stations for eligible transit agencies electing to procure electric buses. Electric transit buses eliminate diesel emissions and reduce fuel and maintenance costs for transit agencies.”

Source: Duke Energy

Source of electricity is taken into consideration in scoring CFAT grant proposals, with renewable-sourced energy scoring higher.  The NC DEQ VW Settlement program will give up to 10 bonus points when RECs are purchased to offset grid electricity purchases.  The Duke Energy program is still in early stages of proposal and development, and it is not yet clear what their criteria will be.

For any questions on Duke Energy’s EVSE initiatives, contact Lisa Poger at Lisa.Poger@duke-energy.com.

2020 Grant Funds Available for EV Charging Station Projects

An EV ARC.

Electric vehicle charging stations are once again eligible technology projects for 2020 Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) funding. Specific electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) projects are eligible in all 100 North Carolina counties. Successful EVSE projects will involve no digging, ground-breaking, or pavement cutting.

Electric vehicle sales in the US surpassed 1 million in October of 2018, and the number is rising. As electric vehicles become more mainstream, expansion of charging stations reassures drivers of the ability of electrification to meet their needs.

“We are excited about this opportunity because demand for plug-in electric vehicles is rising, and the need for additional charging infrastructure is growing,” said Rick Sapienza, Clean Transportation Program Director at NC Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC).

The CFAT grants program is supported with federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) funds provided by the NC Department of Transportation (NC DOT). The primary purpose of the CFAT project is to reduce transportation-related air pollution emissions.  In 2020, up to $1,400,000 in federal funding is being awarded.

Although EVSE has been eligible under CFAT in prior years, recent interpretations of federal regulations made EVSE and other infrastructure projects infeasible. Clarification of those rules helped find this narrow set of projects, which can be funded with less paperwork. For the current round, only EVSE projects that do not have ground disruption or cutting of concrete are eligible. Those projects could include replacement of stranded / non-working chargers, installation of new chargers where the preparation work has been previously completed with proper local permitting and environmental compliance, and installation of new chargers at facilities where no ground disturbance or cutting of concrete is required (such as inside a parking deck).  

In 2019, the CFAT program helped fund 11 electric vehicle charging station projects, delivering 53 new Level 2 EV charging plugs (28 of which are replacements of defunct equipment), 16 solar-powered EV charging plugs and 4 new DC Fast Charge plugs (at two stations).  Read more about these projects (and others) here.

As in prior rounds, other clean transportation technologies are also eligible. In 2018, NCCETC funded conversion of gasoline engines to also run on Liquid Propane Gas (LPG), retrofits of gas vehicles with hybrid electric kits, electric power take-off (ePTO) units to slash idling emissions from utility bucket lift trucks, electric transport refrigeration units (TRUs), and leases of electric cars and other alternative-fueled vehicles.

The deadline to apply for the second round of funding is March 13, 2020.

Learn more about CFAT and view the guidelines, FAQ and application here. All EVSE updates and guidelines are highlighted in yellow. View previous projects funded by CFAT here and here.

Email Rick Sapienza at resapien@ncsu.edu for more information.

Clean Transportation Grants Now Available

Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project Round 2 Proposals Open

The North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) at North Carolina State University announces the following request for proposals (RFP) through the 2019 Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) project. The CFAT project is supported with federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) funds provided by the NC Department of Transportation (NC DOT). The primary purpose of the CFAT project is to reduce transportation-related emissions in 24 eligible North Carolina counties.

The second round of CFAT 2019 funding Request for Proposals (RFP) period has opened.  In 2019, up to $2,350,000 in federal funding is being awarded. The 2019 funds will be awarded in three consecutive rounds of reviews and allocations, until all funds are allocated. The deadline to apply for the second round of funding is March 29, 2019.

Projects located in the following counties are eligible for CFAT funding: Cabarrus, Catawba, *Chatham, Davidson, Davie, Durham, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Franklin, Gaston, Granville, Guilford, *Haywood, *Iredell, Johnston, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, Nash, Orange, Person, Rowan, *Swain, Union, Wake, (*Represents partial counties).

*Available funds: $2,350,000
Maximum per project award: $400,000
Minimum per project award: $10,000
Application deadline: March 29, 2019
Project period: June 14, 2019 – January 30, 2022

Click here for the 2019 CFAT Request for Proposals

Click here for the CFAT RFP FAQs

Click here for the 2019 CFAT RFP Application

NOTE: Applications should be emailed to Rick Sapienza.

Open call for projects through the CFAT Project

NC Clean Energy Technology Center has an open call for projects through the Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project. The application deadline for this new round of funding is December 17, 2018.

The Federal fiscal year 2019 $3.8 million initiative, focused on reducing transportation-related emissions, is supported with federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality funding through the NC Department of Transportation.

The first round of CFAT 2019 funding Request for Proposals (RFP) period has opened and awards will be announced by February 2019.  In 2019, up to $2,350,000 in federal funding is being awarded.  Solicitations for 2019 will occur on a quarterly basis until available funds have been allocated.

Click here for the 2019 CFAT Request for Proposals
Click here for the CFAT RFP FAQs
Click here for the 2019 CFAT RFP Application
To view the media release related to the CFAT project and RFP,
click here.

Solicitation dates are:

  • Round 1: Open RFP 10/12/2018 – Application due 12/17/2018
  • Round 2: Open RFP 01/14/2019 – Application due 03/29/2019
  • Round 3: (if required): Open RFP 04/10/2019–Application due 06/21/2019

Learn more about the CFAT project here.

Applications should be emailed to Rick Sapienza.

Posted by John Bonitz and Nicole Deck

Learn More About New Air Quality Improvement Grant Projects

Earlier this month, the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) announced the results of a call for projects through the Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project. The 2017-2018 $5.6 million initiative, focused on reducing transportation-related emissions, is supported with federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality funding from the N.C. Department of Transportation (DOT).

More than $1,100,101 is being awarded for ten projects to a variety of public and private entities. In total, the awarded equipment displaces 62,949 gallons of diesel/gas a year, reducing 54,042 kg of daily emissions.

The awards include:

• Alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) purchase and conversions by UNC Charlotte

• Electric PTO (power take-off) bucket trucks by Viatec Incorporated and Town of Apex

• AFV conversions to bi-fuel propane by City of Charlotte and thyssenkrupp

• Diesel retrofit by North Carolina Department of Transportation Rail Division

• Electric motorcycle purchases by law enforcement in Davidson County, Orange County, and Town of Matthews

Learn more about each project:

Charlotte, NC skyline. (Wikimedia Commons)

City of Charlotte

The City of Charlotte, a large municipality with a fleet of more than 3,400 vehicles, will convert eleven vehicles to run on liquid propane gas (LPG) to further the City’s greenhouse gas reductions.  After the conversion, eight vehicles in the City’s Landscape Management Division and another three vehicles in Housing Code Enforcement Division will be able to run on either gasoline or propane, according to need, fuel availability, or economics.  NCCETC estimates that this project will displace more than 7,200 gallons of gasoline per year. This project is part of a larger effort to champion vehicle efficiency and pollution reductions by the City: Nearly 22% of the City’s total fleet is alt-fueled, including 30% of their light-duty fleet.  

 

Davidson County Sheriff’s vehicle (Source: https://www.facebook.com/DavidsonCoSheriffsOffice/)

Davidson County Sheriff

Davidson County Sheriff’s Office in Lexington, NC, will add three 2018 Zero Motorcycles to its Motor Division, each with a projected 25,000 annual mileage per year. NCCETC estimates that this use of electric motorcycles will reduce 3,938 kg total emissions annually.  The Sheriff’s Department also plans to implement a data collection tool to capture mileage accumulation information, which will be compared to tracking of the Office’s existing gas fueled motorcycle fleet. The information will be used to determine the fuel economy as well as gallons of gasoline displaced.

 

NCDOT Rail Division train. (Source: https://www.ncdot.gov/divisions/rail/Pages/default.aspx)

NC DOT Rail Division

The North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) Rail Division in Raleigh, NC, has developed a specialized selective catalytic reduction (SCR) emissions reduction system that will be retrofitted onto a Piedmont passenger rail F59PH locomotive. The SCR system is known as a Blended Aftertreatment System, or BATS, and improves the locomotive’s emissions levels 55 to 80%. NCDOT’s Piedmont passenger rail service travels through nine counties between Raleigh and Charlotte, NC – Wake, Orange, Durham, Alamance, Guilford, Davidson, Rowan, Cabarrus, and Mecklenburg – all of which are indicated as EPA non-attainment for one or more pollutants (ozone, CO/CO2). The locomotive will be put into standard revenue service with an estimate of 300 days of use annually, and an expected annual mileage of 103,800 miles per year.  NCCETC estimates this project will reduce an astounding 19,275 kg emissions and reduce demand for 9,000 gallons of fuel every year.  This exciting project also delivers pollution reductions that are extremely cost-effective.

 

Orange County Sheriff’s vehicle. (Source: https://www.facebook.com/ocsonc/)

Orange County Sheriff’s Office

The Orange County Sheriff’s Office plans to acquire an electric motorcycle, expanding the capacity of the specialized Motorcycle Unit to patrol County parks, trails, and greenways along with traffic enforcement, funeral escorts, dignitary escorts, and outreach and education events.  The unit has been using gasoline Harley Davidson FLHP Electra Glide motorcycles, and looks forward to the addition of the stealthy electric motorcycle. The Orange County Sustainability Coordinator will work with the Sheriff’s Office to provide administrative support, tracking, and reporting on this project to estimate and publicize pollution reduction benefits.

Orange County has been diligently working on their fleet to improve fuel economy and reduce transportation pollution for years.  In 2018, the County reported more than 11% of their fleet being alt-fueled, including 23 hybrids and 15 bi-fuel propane vehicles.  Orange County owns and operates 16 Level 2 electric charging stations, and hosts two DC Fast Charge stations in Hillsborough and Chapel Hill.

thyssenkrupp / Alliance Autogas

Thyssenkrupp, an elevator company with a large fleet of light-duty maintenance vehicles, plans to convert seven vans and a truck to reduce pollution emissions in Mecklenburg County.  In Charlotte, NC, six 2018 Ford Transits and one 2018 Ford F-150 will be converted to run on either liquid propane or gasoline. The vehicles will be able to run on either gasoline or propane, according to need, fuel availability, or economics.  NCCETC estimates that this project will displace more than 13,000 gallons of gasoline per year. This is part of a larger corporate shift: Nationwide, in the last four years, thyssenkrupp has reduced their fuel use by over 2 million gallons by right-sizing their vehicles and by moving towards alternative fuels like propane and electric.  Locally, the project will be implemented in cooperation with fuel provider, Alliance Autogas, who will help thyssenkrupp establish necessary propane refueling infrastructure.

 

Downtown Apex. (Wikimedia Commons)

Town of Apex

The Town of Apex, NC, a rapidly growing municipality with 302 vehicles and over 201 pieces of equipment, will retrofit three bucket lift truck vehicles with electric PTO (power take-off) units, allowing the trucks’ diesel engines to reduce idling while operating on overhead utilities, signs, and signals.  By greatly reducing diesel truck idle time, these electric PTOs will significantly reduce vehicle emissions, improving local air quality and the health of bucket truck operators and workers as well as reduce engine maintenance costs. The Town will meticulously collect fuel and mileage data on each vehicle in operation.  By comparing these to historical data, the Town will be able to clearly quantify the benefits of this technology, both in terms of fuel usage and reductions in vehicle pollution, thus estimating the project’s positive effects on air quality in Wake County.

 

Town of Matthews Police vehicle (Source: https://www.facebook.com/matthewsncpd/)

Town of Matthews Police Department

The Matthews Police Department is purchasing an electric motorcycle in order to diversify their fleet, giving them an efficient and environmentally conscious means of accessing and patrolling areas that conventional vehicles cannot reach.  An electric motorcycle will allow MPD to promote safety and environmental protection to pedestrians, cyclists and others in areas such as the Four Mile Creek Greenway, a paved multi-use pathway that is popular for area hikers, bikers, walkers, and animal lovers.  The electric motorcycle will displace a 2008 Ford Crown Victoria patrol car, currently getting 18 miles per gallon of gasoline.

 

UNC Charlotte’s Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs). (Contributed by UNC Charlotte)

UNC Charlotte

The University of North Carolina Charlotte (UNC Charlotte) in Mecklenburg County will replace one heavy duty bucket truck with a hybrid vehicle, and conduct a hybrid electric conversions on one 15-passenger van to reduce emissions per mile.  They will also purchase new bi-fuel light duty trucks to run blends of ethanol. These replacements and up-fits will allow the campus to build on its successful fleet hybrid electrification that began as part of the state Petroleum Displacement program, which includes a fleet of over 100 GEM electric vehicles and awards for maximizing the use of E-85 in flex-fuel vehicles. NCCETC estimates these replacements and conversions will result in 53,975 kg total emissions reduced annually. Carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide reductions are estimated to cost only $2.25 and $2.10 per kilogram per year.

 

SmartPTO installed onto a truck. (Contributed by Viatec)

Viatec Inc

Viatec, a Pittsboro NC company (with locations in Greenville SC and Northern California) will retrofit 12 bucket lift truck vehicles with electric PTO (power take-off) units in NC municipalities with significant air pollution, including Winston-Salem, Greensboro, Charlotte, Raleigh and Cary.  This electric PTO allows bucket truck crews to turn off their engine and perform work in a safe, clean and quiet environment, benefiting the owners, operators and the communities in which they work. By greatly reducing diesel truck idle time, these electric PTOs will significantly reduce vehicle emissions.  NCCETC estimates that bucket trucks burn nearly a gallon of diesel fuels per hour of idling. Based on an industry study conducted by Quanta Services (Green Truck Show March 2018), an electric PTO system is estimated to save about 1800 gallons of fuel annually, in standard operations. In addition, eliminating the idling on the truck engine also reduces carbon emissions to the tune of almost 38,000 pounds of CO2.  The noiseless operation of systems creates safer operating conditions for the crew and the reduced wear-and-tear on the truck engine extends the truck life. This electric PTO is built around an EPA Certified production hardened electric power train and is “Buy America” compliant. The unit is fit for utilities, tree service, sign and light companies and other aerial device application. Industry proven and tested components deliver a reliable and near maintenance-free solution.  

NCCETC Awards $1.1 million in Air Quality Improvement Grants

NCCETC Awards $1.1 million in Air Quality Improvement Grants

New round of funding released

Raleigh, N.C. (October 9, 2018) — The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) at N.C. State University announced the results of a call for projects through the Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project. The 2017-2018 $5.6 million initiative, focused on reducing transportation-related emissions, is supported with federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality funding from the N.C. Department of Transportation (DOT). More than $1,100,101 is being awarded for ten projects to a variety of public and private entities.

Also, a new round of funding has been released, and the applications are due December 17, 2018.

The awards include:

  • Alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) lease and conversions by UNC Charlotte
  • Electric PTO (power take-off) bucket trucks by Viatec Incorporated and Town of Apex
  • AFV conversions to bi-fuel propane by City of Charlotte and thyssenkrupp
  • Diesel retrofit by North Carolina Department of Transportation Rail Division
  • Electric motorcycle leases by law enforcement in Davidson County, Orange County, and Town of Matthews

The CFAT project operates in counties that do not meet National Ambient Air Quality Standards. In total, the awarded equipment displaces 62,949 gallons of diesel/gas a year, reducing 54,042 kg of daily emissions.

The first round of 2019 funding Request for Proposals (RFP) period has opened and awards will be announced by February 2019.  In 2019, up to $2,350,000 in federal funding is being awarded. The 2019 funds will be awarded continuously, through three rounds of reviews and allocations, until all funds are allocated. The deadline to apply for the first round of funding is December 17, 2018. The application can be found here. For more information, click here.

The NCCETC has partnered with Triangle J, Centralina, Upper Coastal Plain and Kerr-Tar Councils of Governments, and the Piedmont Triad Regional Council to conduct education and outreach regarding alternative fuel and fuel conservation technologies and policies. Additional CFAT activities include a public education media campaign, an annual recognition of exemplary efforts to reduce transportation related emissions, and an annual Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference.

About the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center

The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University, advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, sustainable energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information about the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, visit: http://www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu.

Media Contact:

Media Contact: Shannon Helm, 919-423-8340, shannon_helm@ncsu.edu

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