Tag Archives: evs

Electric Vehicles Takeaways in 2018

 EnergyWire recently featured an article “7 Takeaways From a Wild Year for EVs,” covering the biggest news related to electric vehicles in 2018. While electric vehicles are still mostly absent from showrooms, the article stated, signs of progress were apparent in many places last year. In the U.S., the 1 millionth EV was sold, and battery prices continued to drop.

The top 7 takeaways from 2018:

Tesla news: Despite controversy involving Elon Musk’s negative publicity, Tesla hit its 5,000-a-week goal in September, and the Model 3 is by far the top-selling pure-electric car in the US.

New EV pickup truck in the works: Rivian, an auto technology startup, is producing an all-electric pickup truck and SUV with a large amount of specs, including 400 miles on a charge, towing 11,000 pounds, and more. It is expected to arrive around year 2020 or later.

EV charging gets funding: Investment is coming from several quarters, including Volkswagen. Major utilities, seeing an opportunity to sell electrons, are also getting in on the act.

Policymakers and regulators get on board: Many policymakers around the country have made major transportation announcements, including Gov. Jerry Brown calling for California to add 5 million EVs by 2030.

“Invasion of the scooters”: Electric scooters have spread to dozens of cities and have been ridden millions of times, and the companies making them are now worth billions of dollars.

Heavy vehicles make progress: The falling cost of batteries and changing attitude toward carbon emissions and policy changes have moved up the timeline for electric buses and trucks. Dozens of school districts and transit districts also announced they are buying electric buses.

Incumbents step in: GM announced it would lay off thousands of workers, and one reason for it was to double its investment in electric and autonomous vehicles in the next two years. President Trump expressed negative opinions on electric vehicles, and a bill to kill the $7,500-per-vehicle EV tax credit was introduced.


Worldwide and in the United States, electric vehicles had a big year of news and changes – and the state of North Carolina was no exception.

Total EV registrations (both plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles) in North Carolina were at 7,946 in 2017, and in 2018, the numbers jumped to 10,001 just through June, representing a 26 percent growth, according to EVadoption.com.

In August 2018, the US Department of Transportation announced that North Carolina’s City of Greensboro, the Research Triangle Regional Public Transportation Authority (GoTriangle), and Chapel Hill Transit were to be awarded a total of $4,225,000 in federal grants for its Low or No-Emission (Low-No) Bus Program Projects, which supports deployment of electric buses into their fleets.

The City of Greensboro received $1,900,000 in funds to replace older vehicles with battery electric buses and purchase charging stations. The Research Triangle Regional Public Transportation Authority (GoTriangle) received $943,000 to purchase battery electric buses to replace older vehicles at the end of their useful life. Chapel Hill Transit received $1,382,000 to purchase battery electric buses to replace the oldest vehicles in their fleet.
Gov. Roy Cooper signs Executive Order 80 in Cary, NC in October 2018.

In October 2018, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper issued Executive Order 80, which calls for the State of North Carolina to protect its environment while growing clean energy technologies. Cooper called for the number of zero-emission vehicles (“ZEVs”) to grow at least 80,000 by year 2025, according to a press release from Gov. Cooper.

Also in 2018, NCCETC unveiled new EV policy research tools with DSIRE Insight, which provides research and analysis services to energy industry professionals. These reports provide concise, useful information concerning state legislative and regulatory developments, along with actions on electric vehicles and charging infrastructure. The series of quarterly reports is available by subscription here.

Check out last year’s 50 States of Electric Vehicles reports here. The complete 2018 Annual Review will be available at the end of January 2019, and can be found on the same webpage or on www.FuelWhatMatters.org.

Posted by Nicole Deck

Save the date: 2019 Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference

 

Save the date for the 3rd annual Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference, August 7 & 8, 2019 in Durham, NC! The conference provides an opportunity for fleets and transportation professionals to experience the latest vehicle technology, tools, and resources designed to increase efficiency and reduce emissions. The event will include keynote presentations, 50+ panelists, breakout sessions, indoor vehicle/equipment display, and plenty of networking opportunities. Pre-conference events will take place August 6, which will include the Green Fleet Awards Forum along with the NC Smart Fleet and Mobile Care Awards!

Register online now

Check out the Sponsor & Exhibitor Information Guide to learn more about options for exhibiting or sponsoring

Share your ideas for breakout session topics by responding to the Call for Presentations

Who should attend?
Public & Private Fleet Managers
Purchasing Officials
State Government Leaders
Municipal Government Officials
Non-Profit Stakeholders
Clean Cities Coalitions & Stakeholders
Alternative Fuel Trade Organizations
Sustainability Managers
Academic Leaders & Researchers

Attendees can learn & share about:
Alternative Fuels (including biofuels, CNG, electric, propane, renewable diesel)
Advanced Vehicle Technologies
Motor Fleet Management
Vehicle Sharing Technologies
Idle Reduction
Vehicle Right Sizing
Eco-Driving
Autonomous Vehicles & Future Technologies

Stay tuned for more updates! For more information, visit the website, and contact Allison Carr at akcarr@ncsu.edu or 919-515-9781 for any questions.

Posted by Nicole Deck

Gov. Cooper issues executive order to increase number of ZEVs

Last week, Governor Roy Cooper issued Executive Order 80, which calls for the State of North Carolina to protect North Carolina’s environment while growing clean energy technologies.

Executive Order 80 affirms North Carolina’s commitment to reducing statewide greenhouse gas emissions to 40% below 2005 levels, calls for a 40% reduction in energy consumption in state-owned buildings, and calls for an increase in registered, zero-emission vehicles (“ZEVs”) to at least 80,000 – all by year 2025, according to a press release from Gov. Cooper.

The Executive Order includes two transportation initiatives, specifically:

Taking action to increase the number of zero-emission vehicles, like electric vehicles (EVs), registered in North Carolina:

The North Carolina Department of Transportation (**DOT’), in coordination with DEQ, shall develop a North Carolina ZEV Plan (“ZEV Plan”) designed to increase the number of registered ZEVs in the state to at least 80,000 by 2025. The ZEV Plan shall help establish interstate and intrastate ZEV corridors, coordinate and increase the installation of ZEV infrastructure, and incorporate, where appropriate, additional best practices for increasing ZEV adoption. DOT shall complete the ZEV Plan for the Council to submit to the Governor by October 1, 2019.

…and encouraging state agencies to purchase and use ZEVs:

Cabinet agencies shall prioritize ZEVs in the purchase or lease of new vehicles and shall use ZEVs for agency business travel when feasible. When ZEV use is not feasible, cabinet agencies shall prioritize cost-effective, low-emission alternatives. To support implementation of this directive, the North Carolina Department of Administration (“DOA”) shall develop a North Carolina Motor Fleet ZEV Plan (“Motor Fleet ZEV Plan”) that identifies the types of trips for which a ZEV is feasible, recommends infrastructure necessary to support ZEV use, develops procurement options and strategies to increase the purchase and utilization of ZEVs, and addresses other key topics. DOA shall complete the Motor Fleet ZEV Plan and provide an accounting of each agency’s ZEVs and miles driven by vehicle type for the Council to submit to the Governor by October 1, 2019, and annually thereafter.

“This is a good step towards generating awareness and interest for plug-in vehicles,” said Rick Sapienza, Clean Transportation Program Director at NC Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC). “It is going to take a sustained effort that includes policy, education and motivation through incentives to really move the needle – as well as patience.”

It was announced in October 2018 that plug-in electric car sales surpassed 1 million in the US. In 2017 alone, approximately 200,000 electric vehicles were sold in the US, the most yet for any year in the U.S. electric vehicle market, according to a recent 50 States of Electric Vehicles Report, from Q3 2018.

In North Carolina, according to ChargePoint, the state was third in the nation in EV growth in 2016, and Raleigh/Durham were the third fastest growing metropolitan areas for electric vehicles. In the last four years, growth has averaged more than 50 percent year over year, according to the Auto Alliance.

Total EV registrations (both plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles) in North Carolina were at 7,946 in 2017, and in 2018, the numbers jumped to 10,001 just through June, representing a 26 percent growth. 1,670 EVs were sold in North Carolina in 2016, and 2,055 were sold in 2017, representing a Year Over Year increase of 23.10 percent, according to EVadoption.com.

(2018 numbers are through June 2018)
Source: AutoAlliance.org

There are more than 3.5 million vehicles currently registered in North Carolina. Reaching the Executive Order goal would require registering about an average of 11,000 vehicles per year between now and 2025.

“The numbers are growing, but still represent a small percentage of the market,” Sapienza said. “There is plenty of room for growth.”

Charging infrastructure availability and range anxiety remain barriers to consumer adoption of electric vehicles, according to the 2018 50 States of Electric Vehicles report. As battery technology and associated vehicle designs and technologies improve, vehicle ranges are increasing, but the lack of more widespread charging infrastructure remains a deterrent to greater market acceptance in most parts of the country, according to the report. While market factors play a large role in this, legal and regulatory barriers are also affecting the pace and location of infrastructure development.

However, as electric vehicle battery prices drop, and driving range and performance improve, more vehicle manufacturers are announcing the launch of new, all-electric vehicle models, according to the recent 50 States of Electric Vehicles Report.

“The options and technology are getting better every year,” Sapienza said. “We are in a very interesting and exciting time with regard to transportation.”

Read the full Executive Order 80 here.

The 50 States of Electric Vehicles Q3 2018 Report Released

Raleigh, NC – (November 7, 2018) The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) released its Q3 2018 edition of The 50 States of Electric Vehicles. The quarterly series provides insights on state regulatory and legislative discussions and actions on electric vehicles and charging infrastructure.

The report finds that 32 states and the District of Columbia took actions related to electric vehicles and charging infrastructure during Q3 2018 (see figure below), with the greatest number of actions relating to Level 2 charging station deployment, followed by electric vehicle rate tariffs, rebate programs, and DC fast charging station deployment.

The report notes three trends in electric vehicle activity apparent or emerging in Q3 2018: (1) utilities proposing demand charge alternatives for fast charging stations, (2) electric bus investment ramping up, along with vehicle-to-grid testing, and (3) utilities collecting data on electric vehicle charging patterns.

A total of 211 electric vehicle actions were taken during Q3 2018. New Jersey, California, New York, and Massachusetts took the greatest number of actions during the quarter, accounting for over half of the quarter’s activity.

Q3 2018 Legislative and Regulatory Action on Electric Vehicles

“States continue to anticipate more electric vehicles on the road as a growing number of medium and heavy duty models are announced,” noted Allison Carr, Clean Transportation Specialist at NCCETC. “We’re seeing states and utilities work to advance electrification of medium and heavy duty vehicles by offering incentives, building out charging infrastructure, and testing vehicle-to-grid capabilities.”

The report notes the top electric vehicle actions taken during the quarter were:

• The Missouri Court of Appeals reversing a Public Service Commission decision on charging station regulation;

• Pepco filing its Transportation Electrification Program proposal with the DC Public Service Commission;

• Massachusetts and Rhode Island regulators approving electric vehicle programs for National Grid;

• PSE&G New Jersey filing a $261 million electric vehicle program proposal; and

• California utilities filing proposals to deploy charging infrastructure at schools and state parks and beaches.

“Utilities are playing a significant role in accelerating the build-out of charging infrastructure,” observed Autumn Proudlove, Senior Manager of Policy Research at NCCETC. “In addition to directly deploying infrastructure, utilities are proposing demand charge alternatives to encourage development of fast charging stations and launching rebate programs to reduce upfront costs.”

View the 50 States of Electric Vehicles Q3 2018 Executive Summary

View and Purchase the 50 States of Electric Vehicles Q3 2018 FULL Report

View other 50 States Reports – Solar, Grid Modernization and Electric Vehicles

NCSU Announces New Electric Vehicle Fast Charger

New Electric Car Charger Is More Efficient, 10 Times Smaller Than Current Tech

Earlier this month, it was announced that North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers have built an electric vehicle fast charger that is at least 10 times smaller than existing systems and wastes 60 percent less power during the charging process, without sacrificing charging time, according to NCSU.

This new technology is called a medium voltage fast charger (MVFC).

“This new approach offers four times more power from the same system footprint, reducing the system installation costs at the same time,” said Srdjan Srdic, a research professor at NC State who also worked on developing the technology (in a press release.)

Learn more about the fast charger at https://news.ncsu.edu/2018/10/better-fast-charger/.

Posted by Nicole Deck

Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demonstration & NC State Tailgate

Last Friday and Saturday, the NC Clean Energy Technology Center’s Clean Transportation team ended National Drive Electric Week with an Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demonstration & Tailgate for the NC State vs. Virginia Cavaliers football game.

The event began Friday, Sept. 28 with a driver meet-up and car show. There were about 20 plug-in electric, hybrid and biofuel vehicles on display, both from local dealerships and from electric vehicle owners and enthusiasts, including several Tesla models, BMWs, Mitsubishi, Chevrolet, Chrysler, Toyota and more.

Owners enjoyed showing off their vehicles to guests who were curious to learn more about them, and the Clean Transportation team were able to answer questions and hand out fact sheets and studies done by the Center.

There was even a Tesla Model X that did a dance!

 

Saturday was the NC State game outside of the Close-King Indoor Practice Facility where many of the same alternative vehicles were on display for guests to look at inside and out. Nissan representatives were also on site and guests played the “Run the Route Challenge” and the “Blind Spot Challenge.”

Posted by Nicole Deck

Durham Bulls baseball game

The evening before the 2018 Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo, the Clean Transportation team at NC Clean Energy Technology Center displayed several plug-in electric and hybrid vehicles outside of the Durham Bulls baseball game on Aug. 21.

Learn more about electric vehicles by checking out our Electric Vehicles FAQ flyer here.

Attendees of the pre-conference events came to watch the game, enjoy networking and eat a barbeque dinner.

Rick Sapienza, Clean Transportation Director, accepted the game ball on the field and spoke with game announcers in a live radio interview (listen to below)!

 

50 States of Electric Vehicles Q2 2018 report

36 States and D.C. Took 274 Actions Related to Electric Vehicles

The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) released its Q2 2018 edition of The 50 States of Electric Vehicles. The quarterly series provides insights on state regulatory and legislative discussions and actions on electric vehicles and charging infrastructure. The full Q2 2018 report, or an annual subscription to the report, may be purchased here.

The report finds that 36 states and the District of Columbia took actions related to electric vehicles and charging infrastructure during Q2 2018 (see figure below), with the greatest number of actions relating to electric vehicle rebate programs, followed by DC fast charging and Level 2 charging station deployment.

The report notes three trends in electric vehicle activity apparent or emerging in Q2 2018: (1) states diverging on the issue of regulatory oversight of electric vehicle charging stations, (2) states and utilities working to expand electric vehicle and charging access to low-income and disadvantaged communities, and (3) electric vehicle activity concentrating in particular states and regions.

A total of 274 electric vehicle actions were taken during Q2 2018 – more than were taken in the entirety of 2017 (227 actions). Seven states – New York, New Jersey, California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Vermont, and Minnesota – accounted for over half of these actions.

Q2 2018 Legislative and Regulatory Action on Electric Vehicles

“Although the majority of electric vehicle policy activity is occurring in particular states and regions, many states throughout the country are beginning to study questions related to electric vehicles and address initial regulatory issues surrounding vehicle charging infrastructure,” noted David Sarkisian, Senior Policy Analyst at NCCETC.

The report notes the top electric vehicle actions taken during the quarter were:

• California regulators approving $738 million for electric vehicle infrastructure investments;

Governor Cuomo announcing up to $250 million for electric vehicle expansion in New York;

Utility regulators in Alabama and New Orleans addressing oversight of electric vehicle charging stations;

The Public Utilities Commission of Nevada permitting NV Energy to own, operate, and rate base electric vehicle charging infrastructure; and

The Vermont State legislature initiating an investigation into electric vehicles and charging.

“While we continue to see legislative actions on electric vehicles most concentrated in the states that are part of the Multi-State Zero-Emission Vehicle Taskforce, action pertaining to electric vehicles is occurring across the country,” noted Heather Brutz, Clean Transportation Manager at NCCETC. “This activity ranges from efforts to remove regulatory barriers to the creation of new incentive programs to directly promote vehicle and charging infrastructure deployment.”

To view the executive summary, click here.

To purchase the full report, click here.

NCCETC releases 50 States of Electric Vehicles Report

42 States and DC Took Action on Electric Vehicles During Q1 2018

The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center released its Q1 2018 edition of The 50 States of Electric Vehicles. The quarterly series provides insights on state regulatory and legislative discussions and actions on electric vehicles and charging infrastructure.

The report finds that 42 states and the District of Columbia took actions related to electric vehicles and charging infrastructure during Q1 2018 (see figure below), with the greatest number of actions relating to electric vehicle fees, fast charging deployment, and electric vehicle studies.

The report notes four trends in electric vehicle activity apparent or emerging in Q1 2018: (1) states considering multi-faceted electric vehicle plans, (2) contention around utility ownership of electric vehicle charging infrastructure, (3) examining the role of demand charges in vehicle charging rates, and (4) piloting the co-location of energy storage systems with electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

A total of 275 electric vehicle actions were taken during Q1 2018 – more than were taken in the entirety of 2017 (227 actions). New York, New Jersey and Hawaii took the greatest number of actions during the quarter, followed by Massachusetts, Washington and Minnesota.

Q1 2018 Legislative and Regulatory Action on Electric Vehicles

“So far in 2018, we see a number of states taking actions that incorporate multiple strategies or involve existing statewide goals,” noted Allison Carr, Clean Transportation Specialist at NCCETC. “Several states and utilities are starting to connect electric vehicle planning with other statewide electric grid modernization, transportation and environmental goals.”

The report notes the top electric vehicle actions taken during the quarter were:

• Hawaii utilities publishing their Electrification of Transportation Strategic Roadmap;

• California regulators approving utilities’ first wave of proposed electric vehicle programs and investments;

• A Maryland working group proposing a statewide electric vehicle portfolio;

• Missouri utilities proposing new electric vehicle programs; and

• Pennsylvania regulators issuing a policy statement on third-party electric vehicle charging.

“It is exciting to watch states live up to their reputation as laboratories of democracy,” said Brian Lips, Senior Policy Project Manager at NCCETC. “States are testing out a variety of strategies to build strong electric vehicle markets and charging networks, with many states taking multi-pronged approaches themselves.”

View the 50 States of Electric Vehicles Q1 2018 Executive Summary

View and Purchase the 50 States of Electric Vehicles Q1 2018 FULL Report

View the 50 States Reports – Solar, Grid Modernization and Electric Vehicles

Driving on Solar Miles

Driving on Solar Miles: Integrating Residential Solar and Electric Vehicle Charging panel at the 2018 State Energy Conference of North Carolina

Heather Brutz of NCCETC introduces the panelists of Driving on Solar Miles: Integrating Residential Solar and Electric Vehicle Charging at the 2018 State Energy Conference of North Carolina. Photo by Nicole Deck.

Industry experts discussed options available today for integrating residential solar with electric vehicle charging at the 2018 State Energy Conference of North Carolina last month. Panelists addressed some of the most commonly used technologies as well as the future of residential solar, electric vehicle charging and the grid.

The three panelists were Bharat Balagopal, a doctoral student at North Carolina State University; Stew Miller, President of Yes Solar Solutions; and Stan Cross, CEO of Brightfield Transportation Solutions. Heather Brutz, Transportation Finance and Operations Manager at NCCETC, was moderator.

Stan Cross (Brightfield Transportation Solutions) shared a map of electric vehicles and charging stations in North Carolina, and discussed the statistics of annual community benefits per 10,000 EVs:

• Approx. EV miles driven annually = 120M miles

• Barrels of Oil Avoided by EVs = 221K barrels

• GHG reduced from gasoline to grid power = 44M lbs.

• GHG reduced when Solar Driven = 84M lbs.

• EV-related fuel savings = $8.2M

• EV-related maintenance savings = $3.6M

• EV-related $$ Retained in the Community = $7.6M

Stew Miller (Yes Solar Solutions) said that the average gas-powered vehicle emits the equivalent of 11,435 lbs. of CO2 annually.  And on average, using the NC electric grid to charge an EV releases 4,185 lbs. of CO2 each year.

Daily Cycle of Solar & Storage graphic by Yes Solar Solutions.

Miller said that by using solar and storage like Tesla Powerwall to generate and store the electricity needed to power their vehicles, EV drivers can reduce their transportation-related emissions to zero. Powering EVs with a home solar system is typically cheaper than charging your car with electricity from the grid as well, Miller said.

Bharat Balagopal discussed electric vehicle charging and integration with the smart grid.

According to Balagopal, benefits of community charging are:
• EVs are flexible loads that can improve the stability of the grid
• Sooth the adverse effect of renewable fluctuations by quickly changing the charge rates
• Improve the power quality by peak shaving (reducing the load) and valley filling (increasing the load)

However, risks include:
• Uncontrolled charging of multiple EVs can destabilize the grid
• Simultaneous charging of EVs can introduce huge load to the grid

To alleviate those risks, Balagopal said, researchers at Advanced Diagnosis, Automation, and Control Lab (ADAC) devised a method for smart charging of EVs to maximize benefits and minimize the risks of EV integration. Their technology, he said, can intelligently schedule the charging of the EVs based on energy needs, working schedule, renewable energy generation and load pattern.

There are two main enabling technologies that allow them to intelligently control the charging of the EVs — the Collaborative Distributed Energy Management System and the Smart Battery Gauge. To learn more, click here.

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