Tag Archives: raleigh

Renewable Propane: A Clean Choice to Power Your Vehicle

The North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) works with government, non-profit organizations and businesses to help diversify fuel supplies and support cleaner, more vibrant local and state economies. The Clean Transportation program at NCCETC propels the development, awareness and use of alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies. 

One alternative fuel, propane, is a popular choice across the United States for a variety of fleet vehicle applications including school buses, shuttle buses, vans, taxis and law enforcement vehicles. According to a report by the Gas Technology Institute prepared for the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC), there are over 147,000 vehicles on the road in the U.S. fueled by propane.

“NCCETC’s Clean Transportation team is ready to support fleets interested in exploring the financial and environmental benefits of different fuel choices, including propane,” said Heather Brutz, Director of the Clean Transportation program at NCCETC. “Diversifying our nation’s fuel supply with domestic fuels like propane – strengthens U.S. energy security while also reducing harmful emissions.” 

Introduction to Propane for Transportation

Propane, also known as Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), is a simple hydrocarbon byproduct of natural gas processing or crude oil refining. Currently the third most common engine fuel source in the world, propane is a clean-burning alternative fuel that has been used for decades to power light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. 

The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) reports that propane has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is stored as a liquid in a pressurized tank onboard the vehicle to maximize energy storage. As the pressure is released, the liquid propane vaporizes and turns into gas that is used in a combustion engine. 

The commercial grade of propane sold for use in motor vehicles in North America is also called HD-5 or Autogas and is a mixture of propane with smaller amounts of other gases. The U.S. Energy Information Association reported that, as of 2020, more than 93% of the U.S. propane supply was produced in North America. More information about propane can be found on the AFDC website here

The Benefits of Choosing Propane

Fleets stand to gain numerous benefits from adopting propane vehicles, including potential emissions reductions without compromising on performance. Propane-powered vehicles offer comparable horsepower, torque, and payload capacity to conventionally fueled vehicles. 

As Brutz noted, diversifying the U.S. fuel supply helps reduce overall dependence on imported petroleum. The continued use of alternative fuels and other clean transportation technologies to reduce petroleum consumption increases national energy security while decreasing transportation energy costs for businesses and consumers.

Propane is produced domestically and has high energy density with relatively low cost compared to gasoline and diesel. As one of the most accessible alternative fuels to the general public, propane is a popular choice for high-mileage vehicles. 

Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and select dealerships offer a number of medium- and heavy-duty propane vehicle models. In addition to OEM models, fleets and consumers have the ability to convert existing gasoline vehicles using qualified system retrofitters for propane operation. 

In vehicle applications, propane-fueled vehicles have lower carbon dioxide (NOx) emissions in comparison to equivalent gasoline or diesel vehicles. When replacing conventional fuels such as gasoline, propane vehicles also reduce full-fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions and source energy consumption. 

Renewable Propane

Renewable propane, which is chemically identical to conventional propane, is produced from biomass-based feedstocks, including used cooking oil, animal fats or 20% dimethyl ether. With all the same great features as conventional propane – reliability, portability, power and reduced carbon emissions – renewable propane has a low (CI) value, depending on its feedstock.

Renewable propane is made from a variety of different feedstocks and sustainable materials. The image below, originally from PERC, shows how renewable propane is made.

The CI value of a fuel is able to measure the environmental impact of its consumption. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) set annual CI standards in 2009 through the state’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS). Conventional propane already has a relatively low CI of 79 when compared to diesel, but renewable propane’s CI can be as low as 20.5 depending on the variations in feedstock type which the fuel is produced from. This makes renewable propane one of the cleanest alternative fuels on the market with a carbon intensity value five times lower than diesel.

Last month, the City of Raleigh announced it will be moving a portion of its fleet to run on renewable propane. Rick Longobart, Fleet Operations Manager for the City of Raleigh, shared, “I’m proud to say today that 85% of our fleet runs off of some type of alternative energy.” The City of Raleigh is the first city in the state of North Carolina to use renewable propane to fuel its fleet.

Longobart noted that Raleigh’s renewable propane will primarily be produced from plant based vegetable oil which possesses an ultra-low CI as determined by CARB, ultimately reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the city’s fleet vehicles. “As we move towards a more sustainable climate and trying to reach our climate action goals of 80% renewable energy or zero emissions by 2050, this is one effort that is going to get us there,” Longobart added.

PERC’s President and CEO Tucker Perkins spoke at the ribbon cutting for a new renewable propane fueling station for the City of Raleigh on September 28, 2023. Perkins identified propane as a pathway with tremendous promise to change the economics of the community and lives of the citizens living in it. 

“As we think about renewable propane, if I had one message to give to you, it’s that, yes it is real,” Perkins said. “The carbon savings are real, the particulate matter is zero, the NOx emissions are virtually zero, and this is a fuel of the future.” 

To learn more about renewable propane and its potential for sustainable transportation, visit PERC’s webpage on the topic. 

Driving the Future: Captivating Moments from the 2023 Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference and Expo

Last month, more than 400 attendees joined the North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) in Raleigh, NC for the 2023 Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo (SFT). Conference guests were able to discover the latest and greatest in sustainable fleet technology, operations and implementation over the course of three days while networking with other fleet professionals and technology providers. 

“The SFT Conference this year gave fleet and transportation experts a valuable platform to explore cutting-edge vehicle technologies, as well as tools and resources tailored to enhance efficiency and emissions reduction,” said Heather Brutz, Director of the Clean Transportation program at NCCETC.

In its seventh year, the annual SFT Conference returned to the Raleigh Convention Center where the inaugural conference was held in 2017. The Raleigh Convention Center’s large exhibit halls were the perfect space to display all of the heavy, medium, and light-duty vehicles in addition to transportation and charging technologies for attendees to explore during expo hall hours. 

The exhibit hall was brimming with exhibitors for the 2023 conference including AssetWorks; Alliance Autogas; Kempower; Southeast Propane Alliance; Propane Education & Research Council; Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition; Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition; Triangle Clean Cities Coalition; Lightning eMotors; Advanced Energy; DC-America; Daimler Truck NA/Thomas Built Buses/Freightliner Custom Chassis; North Carolina Department of Transportation; Piedmont Natural Gas; Verizon Connect; Pakistan Smart Energy; ZEVX Inc.; Guardian Fueling Technologies; bp pulse; Revels Turf & Tractor Co.; Forward Thinking Systems, LLC; Atom Power; Sourcewell; NAFA Fleet Management Association; Pioneer Power e-Mobility Solutions; Viatec; The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company; ROUSH CleanTech; Faster Asset Solutions; Webasto Charging Systems, Inc.; and PortFi.

Pictured: Attendees gathered around a display of Viatec’s flagship electric power take-off (ePTO) product, SmartPTO, which can be retrofitted to fleet vehicles and provides the benefits of enhanced safety, reduced maintenance, lower cost of ownership, and social responsibility for electric utility providers.

Pictured: The industry’s first and only production all-electric bucket truck which debuted last year thanks to a unique collaboration between Viatec, Terex and Navistar/International Trucks.

Pictured: Pioneer Power Mobility’s e-Boost mobile electric vehicle (EV) fast charging solution plugged into a Volvo’s first all electric crossover C40 Recharge.

Pictured: The City of Durham’s Mach-E and City of Charlotte’s Ford F150 and Mach-E fleet vehicles. 

On August 14, 2023 the winners of the 16th annual Green Fleet Awards were announced by NAFA Fleet Management Association (NAFA) during the pre-conference day at the 2023 SFT Conference.

Pictured: Ryan Krogh, Manager of Production System Solutions at John Deere, delivered the opening keynote, From Products to Solutions: The Next Phase of Technology.

Pictured: The keynote plenary, From Good Ideas to Success Stories, featured a panel moderated by Leigh Shamblin, Director of Leadership and Professor of Practice for NC State University Poole College of Management and also included Jamie Cooke, Chief Operating Officer for the Department of Generals Services in Montgomery County, Maryland; Al Curtis, Fleet Services Director for Cobb County, Georgia; and Rick Longobart, Fleet Operations Manager for the City of Raleigh, North Carolina.

Pictured: Ameya Joshi from Corning, Inc. was on the panel for the Advancements in Medium/Heavy Duty Vehicles and Infrastructure keynote plenary along with Rick Sapienza from NCCETC, Mark Childers from Thomas Built Buses, Stuart Weidie from Alliance AutoGas, Jennifer Weaver from Clean Fuels Alliance America, and Marcus Suvanto from Kempower.

Pictured: The final keynote plenary, Advancements in Light Duty Vehicles and Infrastructure, was moderated by Heather Brutz of NCCETC. She was joined by Brian Bradford, Chief Commercial Officer of Jule Power; Bob Glaser, President of the North Carolina Automobile Dealers Association; Ryan Kennedy, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Atom Power; and Chris Thomas, Government Sales Manager at Stellantis.

The 2023 SFT Conference offered 12 breakout sessions across three tracks related to Funding and Planning, Vehicle Technologies, and Fueling and Charging Infrastructure. Pictures from several breakout sessions can be seen below.

The NCCETC hosts the annual Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference as part of its mission to advance a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies.

PowerPoint presentations will be available in the coming weeks at www.SustainableFleetExpo.com. Stay tuned for next year’s conference dates. Don’t miss out on future updates for the 2024 Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference – sign up for the clean transportation newsletter now! 

35 Highlights from 35 Years of the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center

The North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC), at N.C. State University, advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating, and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices, and policies. For the last 35 years, the Center has worked closely with partners in government, industry, academia, and the non-profit community while evolving to include a greater geographic scope and array of clean energy technologies. As a result of this evolution, the Center has grown into a state agency respected for its assistance to the burgeoning “clean tech” sector in North Carolina, as well as one of the premier clean energy centers of knowledge in the United States.

Please join us in celebrating the Center’s 35th Anniversary in 2023 as we take a look back on 35 highlights from over the years.

35 HIGHLIGHTS:

1. The N.C. Solar House was built in 1981 and designed to incorporate readily available solar and energy-efficient technologies to serve three primary purposes: (1) to demonstrate how solar and energy-efficient technologies can be effectively incorporated into a solar house of traditional design typical of the region; (2) to serve as an educational resource and laboratory for students, clubs, professional organizations and the general public; and (3) to serve as a research laboratory for graduate students in engineering, architecture, interior design and other related disciplines.

2. The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, or “Center”, was first established in December 1987 as the North Carolina Solar Center. The state government of North Carolina, N.C. State University, and the solar industry came together to launch the Solar Center with sponsorship from the State Energy Office to meet the need for a central clearinghouse that could assist the state’s citizens, businesses and institutions in using solar energy. Since its formation, the Center has concentrated a large portion of its resources to train professionals and to provide educational opportunities for decision-makers and the public to learn about solar energy.

3. The Solar Communities Program was created in 1989 to extend Center services and programs into selected communities across the state. In each “Solar Community,” the Center teamed with the county office on the N.C. Cooperative Extension Service to a staff a steering committee of local leaders and energy professionals.

4. In 1991, the Solar Communities Program was awarded the National Environment Achievement Award by Renew America.

5. With assistance from the national Photovoltaics for Utilities Program, the Center convened the N.C. Photovoltaics for Utilities Working Group in 1992, a collaborative of utilities, regulators, educators, industry and environmental groups working together to accelerate utility utilization and acceptance of this rapidly emerging technology.

6. The Solar Center entered the international arena in 1995, providing internet training and technical assistance to the International Solar Energy Society at its bi-annual conference in Zimbabwe.

7. Established in 1995, DSIRE is operated by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center at N.C. State University and was originally funded by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy.

8. The Center received funding from the Rotary Club in 1997 for the Solar Center PV Program in Bolivia. The Center installed photovoltaic systems on 15 rural schools in the Alalay region in the Andes Mountains.

9. In 1999, under the leadership of the State Energy Office and the North Carolina Solar Center, North Carolina made a commitment to promote solar energy in North Carolina by becoming a Million Solar Roofs Initiative Partnership. It was 1 of 94 Partnerships across the country collectively working to encourage more solar energy systems in our communities by 2010.

10. In 2003, the Center became home to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Southeast Clean Energy Application Center. Today the Center manages the DOE Southeast Combined Heat and Power Technical Assistance Partnership (CHP TAP), promoting the market for CHP, waste heat recovery, district energy and microgrids.

11. The Center became the only training provider in North Carolina to have been awarded as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) Institute of Power Quality (ISPQ) Accredited Training Program Provider in 2004. After an intensive 18-month process including an extensive site assessment, the Center’s thermal and PV courses were awarded as IREC ISPQ Training Programs– the highest international accreditation standard for renewable energy training programs.

12. The N.C. HealthyBuilt Homes Program (HBH), a statewide green-building program launched in March 2004, was a collaboration of the Center in Raleigh, the state energy office, North Carolina Department of Administration, NC HealthyBuilt Homes community partners and local professional building organizations. The program supported small and medium-size homebuilders with technical and marketing assistance, design reviews, workshops, presentations and field-consultation services that teach green-building practices.

13. The Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project provides funding for clean transportation technologies in eligible counties in North Carolina. The CFAT Project is funded through the Congestion, Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds from FHWA and NCDOT. From 2006 through 2019 we have provided $11.9 million in federal funds to help private and public fleets in North Carolina purchase clean transportation technologies to improve North Carolina’s air quality.

14. The Center managed the NC Biomass Council, which produced The North Carolina Biomass Roadmap: Recommendations for Fossil Fuel Displacement through Biomass Utilization report in 2007 to increase biomass utilization and the production of in-state biofuels, biopower and bioproducts.

15. The Center participated in an offshore wind feasibility study managed by the North Carolina Department of Commerce and the State Energy Office. The Center’s portion of the project focused on offshore wind outreach in North Carolina, as well as efforts to raise the profile of North Carolina to the wind energy industry in the United States and Europe. The study and subsequent report was submitted to the North Carolina General Assembly in June 2009.

16. In 2014, the Center developed a new internship program which allows us to better serve undergraduate and graduate students at N.C. State University and beyond.

17. During the last month of 2014, the N.C. Solar Center officially changed its name to the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC).

18. The State Energy Conference of North Carolina is an annual conference hosted by NCCETC and N.C. State University’s McKimmon Center. Over the last six years, NCCETC has grown the State Energy Conference from around 400 to over 900 attendees from a variety of backgrounds, including state and local government, non-profits, startups, academia and corporate organizations – all joined under the SEC’s theme: “Connecting North Carolina’s Diverse Energy Economy.”

19. In 2017 the first annual Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo was held to expand education, training, and networking on advanced clean transportation technologies. The event has been hosted every year since (even going virtual for two years during the pandemic), reaching audiences from across the Southeast totaling more than 4,000.

20. The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center publishes three quarterly reports that provide a comprehensive review of policy changes under consideration related to three technology areas: (1) The 50 States of Solar, (2) The 50 States of Grid Modernization and (3) The 50 States of Electric Vehicles. The 50 States report series is intended to keep industry stakeholders informed of policy and regulatory changes in the clean energy sector with timely, comprehensive, and unbiased updates. Reports provide a complete review of quarterly actions, summarized by our team of state policy experts, along with links to primary sources, summary graphics, and analysis.

21. The Energy Policy & Markets team from NCCETC launched DSIRE Insight in December 2018. DSIRE Insight offers clean energy professionals in-depth quarterly policy reports, as well as biweekly legislative and regulatory tracking services with comprehensive insight into the rapidly changing energy policy landscape.

22. The NCCETC received a grant award from the Solar Energy Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy in 2016. This project, named Community Solar for the Southeast, was created to provide resources and to support the development of community solar programs at electric cooperatives and municipal utilities across the southeastern United States. Over four years, NCCETC worked with a number of coops and munis to understand the challenges of developing community solar programs and develop resources that can aid in the development of community solar projects across the region. The project concluded in 2020.

23. The NCCETC and the North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association (NCSEA) managed the development of a Template Solar Ordinance which was published in 2016. This template ordinance provides consensus input on a best practice model for how solar development can be regulated and facilitates the adoption of local regulation backed by industry, government and citizen input.

24. The U.S. DOE announced the selection of a team led by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center at North Carolina State University as one of eight new regional Combined Heat and Power Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) in November 2017. The Southeast CHP TAP at NCCETC promotes and assists in transforming the market for CHP, waste heat to power and district energy technologies/concepts in the following eight southeast states: North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida, as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

25. The NCCETC was a part of the Powering Energy Efficiency and Impacts Framework (PEEIF) project, a two-year U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored initiative, seeks to develop a data-driven framework to increase energy-related program effectiveness in low-income households. The project’s final report was published in March 2019.

26. In 2019, Fayetteville Public Works Commission opened the first municipal community solar farm in North Carolina. NCCETC provided a technical and economic analysis for the community 1.5 MW solar photovoltaic array, including a 560 kW battery, to help the municipal utility consider the viability, costs and value of the renewable energy in an effort to meet renewable energy requirements and promote customer participation in solar.

27. NCCETC introduced its Energy and Sustainability Services (ESS) – a suite of services from the Center aimed at optimizing sustainability and energy-related objectives for business, industry, government and utilities – before hosting the first installation of the ESS Webinar Series in December 2020.

28. Solar-Plus for Electric Co-ops (SPECs) was launched in 2020 to help optimize the planning, procurement and operations of battery storage and solar-plus-storage for electric cooperatives. SPECs was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for Round 2 of the Solar Energy Innovation Network (SEIN).

29. The Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE), operated by NCCETC, and EnergySage partnered to enable homeowners to find, research and receive quotes on solar installations all on the DSIRE website. Also in 2020, DSIRE announced the launch of two new research offerings through DSIRE Insight related to the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) and investor-owned utility avoided cost rates.

30. At the end of 2020, NCCETC partnered with Roanoke Electric Cooperative to demonstrate cutting edge vehicle-to-grid technology. For two years the Cooperative worked with Fermata Energy to pilot the first electric vehicle charging system that meets the North American standard for two-way current as verified by Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Preliminary findings from this demonstration showed the economic potential of using bidirectional charging technologies to feed energy stored in electric vehicle batteries back to the grid or a building, especially when the grid is experiencing high demand.  Now after two years, the value streams are clear.

31. As part of Governor Roy Cooper’s Executive Order (EO) 80, the North Carolina Department of Commerce commissioned a report, which was researched and produced by BVG Associates and a team of experts from Lloyds Register Energy Americas, Timmons Group and NCCETC. The full report, Building North Carolina’s Offshore Wind Supply Chain, was released in 2021 and is available online at nccommerce.com.

32. NCCETC announced the addition of incentive programs for electric vehicles and charging infrastructure to DSIRE in August of 2021. DSIRE now includes over 250 incentive programs for the purchase of electric vehicles and associated charging infrastructure.

33. The two-year project “Planning an Affordable, Resilient, and Sustainable Grid in North Carolina” (PARSG), concluded in 2022. The project began in 2019 after North Carolina received a competitive award of $300,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy. PARSG is a joint project by the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), UNC Charlotte’s Energy Production Infrastructure Center (EPIC), and NCCETC. The project included opportunities for interested stakeholders to review metrics developed by the research team and provide input into an advanced grid scenario focused on enabling a more decentralized resilient grid, including micro/mini grids that can support critical services, such as hospitals, in the case of power outages. As part of PARSG, NCCETC partnered with New Hanover County to conduct resiliency analyses of local facilities and provide potential solutions which could ensure a reduction in the cumulative hours customers are without power after an outage.

34. Staff from the NCCETC served as SolSmart advisors to provide technical assistance to communities in North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida to help them receive a national SolSmart designation of Gold, Silver or Bronze based on actions across permitting and inspection, planning and zoning, government operations, community management and market development. The designation recognizes communities that have taken bold steps to encourage solar energy growth and remove obstacles to solar development. There are 19 communities in the Carolinas – 3 in South Carolina and 16 in North Carolina – that have achieved SolSmart designation as of April 2022.

35. In October 2022, NCCETC concluded two projects focused on community solar access and achieving resilience benefits for low and moderate-income communities. The projects – Community Solar Access for Low and Moderate-Income Utility Customers, and Achieving Resilience Benefits Through Utility Solar + Storage Deployment in Low-Income Communities – were funded through the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA).

Kick Off National Drive Electric Week With the NC Clean Energy Technology Center

National Drive Electric Week starts this month, September 23 through October 2, 2022! National Drive Electric Week, or NDEW, is an annual event in the United States celebrating all-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. The national campaign is presented by Plug in America, Sierra Club and Electric Auto Association and consists of hundreds of free events across the nation. 

The NC Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) is kicking off this year’s National Drive Electric Week at the Wake Forest versus Clemson University football game Saturday, September 24. Before the game begins, fans are invited to join the NCCETC for a tailgate and plug-in electric vehicle (EV) car show at Truist Field on Wake Forest University’s campus. The following Thursday, September 29, NCCETC is hosting another EV car show and demonstration with test drives at Venture Plaza on NC State’s Centennial Campus. 

National Drive Electric Week began in 2011 to provide free, helpful and in-depth information for those beginning their electric vehicle journey. Today, more than two million EVs have been sold in the United States, and 90 percent of EV drivers report they will purchase another EV for their next vehicle, according to a recent survey conducted by Plug In America

NDEW events help spread awareness about the benefits of driving electric, including decreased emissions, fuel savings and enhanced performance of electric vehicles. Thousands of North Carolinians attend National Drive Electric week events each year, and there are currently ten individual events currently scheduled for this year across the state. 

The Clean Transportation Program at NCCETC has participated in the national campaign for several years now and, in 2021, sponsored two in-person EV ride and drive events in addition to two virtual webinars on electric vehicle topics including innovative charging solutions and idle reduction

“Every year during National Drive Electric Week events, we give people the opportunity to get their hands on an EV and ask EV owners all of their questions,” explained Heather Brutz, Clean Transportation Program Director for NCCETC. “When they leave, they are confident in making their next vehicle purchase electric and even come back to showcase their new EVs to get others to make the switch at future events!”

Learn more about upcoming events and register to attend by visiting the links listed below. 

Those interested in going electric can also explore a variety of EVs and their drivers’ experiences driving electric through our Electric Driver Profile series. NCCETC previously sat down with seven EV drivers to hear about the benefits of going electric.

Our newest EV Driver Profile features Kelly Witter, a recent EV owner who shared, “EVs are quiet, have fewer moving parts and reduce air pollution and fossil fuel use. Plus, charging at public stations is more enjoyable than gas stations and I can be productive while I charge.”

Getting North Carolina Ready for Electric Vehicle Charging

Electrification of transportation is exciting and challenging. Market forces are already pushing us in the direction of electric vehicles (EV), but our electric “refueling” infrastructure is lagging. Public and private investments are being made and more are coming in the form of grants, incentives, and substantial federal investments. In North Carolina alone, VW Settlement funds will bring ~$10 million this year.  And the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) National EV infrastructure program (NEVI) will invest more than $109 million each year over the next five years in North Carolina.  

Now, our challenge here in North Carolina is to prepare for this influx of funding, to ensure we are ready for it, and that we use it effectively and efficiently. This guidance document helps the reader understand how to get ready and where to find detailed guides for different aspects of building the new EV charging infrastructure.  

There are many many “guides” already published, so we sorted through them to find the best and give pointers to them all. Now, you can easily find the best resources for you in our guide to the guides: Getting North Carolina Ready for Electric Vehicle Charging. We encourage local government planners, managers, fleet officers, and finance & purchasing administrators to be aware of this “guide to the guides.”

Let’s get ready!

What You’ll Find in The Guide

Getting North Carolina Ready for Electric Vehicle Charging covers:

  • Charging for homeowners
  • Charging for renters (apartment, townhome and condo dwellers)
  • Charging at work
  • The state of EV charger deployment in North Carolina
  • Locally-sourced North Carolina EV charging guides
  • Links to several valuable guides from organizations like:

    • The U.S. Department of Transportation
    • The Cadmus Group (in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Transportation)
    • Advanced Energy
    • Plug-In NC 
    • The City of Raleigh
    • Sourcewell
    • NC Department of Administration
    • North Carolina Sheriff’s Association 

>> Click here to view the full guidance document.

Posted by Nicole Deck

National Drive Electric Week 2019 Photos

Last week, the NC Clean Energy Technology Center celebrated National Drive Electric Week 2019 with six events in Raleigh at NC State University, Winston-Salem at Wake Forest University, and Pittsboro, NC! Check out the photos from the events below.

NC State Football Tailgate & Expo (Photos by Nicole Deck)

 

Centennial Campus Expo + Ride & Drive (Photos by Nicole Deck)

 

Driver Meet-Up + Ride & Drive (Photos by Nicole Deck)

Winston-Salem events at Wake Forest University (Photos by Matt Abele)

Downtown Pittsboro Expo (Photos by John Bonitz)

Clean Transportation Demonstration Days Oct. 8 & 9

Join the NC Clean Energy Technology Center, Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition and Triangle J Council of Governments for two Clean Transportation Demonstration Days this October 8 & 9!

Register for the Oct. 8 Concord event here, and register for the Oct. 9 Raleigh event here.

Ron Luttrell of Zero Motorcycles talks to a guest test driving a Zero Motorcycle at First Responder Clean Transportation Demonstration Day.
Photo by Mark Lienhard, EVOLVE GT LLC.

Executive Order 80 calls for the State of North Carolina to protect its environment while growing clean energy technologies. The order “affirms North Carolina’s commitment to reducing statewide greenhouse gas emissions to 40% below 2005 levels, calls for a 40% reduction in energy consumption in state-owned buildings, and calls for an increase in registered, zero-emission vehicles (“ZEVs”) to at least 80,000 – all by year 2025.”

Clean Transportation Demonstration Days support Executive Order 80 and give government entities across North Carolina information and experience with clean transportation technologies. The day will consist of classroom instruction with real-world case study results, hands-on product static review, networking, and a closed-course ride and drive for those who wish to participate.

Classroom instruction will include alternative fuel options, telematics and other new technologies, safety and more. There will be a diverse display of vehicles including a Nissan LEAF, Chevrolet Bolt, Chrysler Pacifica, police vehicle and fire truck, Zero Motorcycle and more. Lunch will be provided.

*Note: The event is only open to government entities and utilities.

For any questions, contact Rick Sapienza at resapien@ncsu.edu or 919-515-2788 (office)/ 919-332-4510 (cell).

Register for the Oct. 8 Concord event here, and register for the Oct. 9 Raleigh event here.

Six National Drive Electric Week Events This September

 

Join the NC Clean Energy Technology Center for National Drive Electric Week 2019! We will have six events located in Winston-Salem, Pittsboro and Raleigh, NC, including vehicle expos/tailgates, ride and drives, and driver meet-ups. Visit www.DriveElectricWeek.org to find an event near you!

Electric Vehicle Car Show & Tailgate, 4-6 p.m. Friday, September 13 in Winston-Salem, BB&T Field: Join us to kick off National Drive Electric Week at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem with a tailgate and plug-in electric vehicle car show at the Wake Forest Vs. UNC Chapel Hill football game!  Kick-off is at 6 p.m. on Friday, September 13. The vehicles will be located in front of the Bridger Field House.

(For game day on Friday, due to the congestion and traffic, if you do not have tickets for the game or parking arrangements, it is not advised that you come visit the plug-in electric vehicle show. )

Register here.

Driver Meet-Up, Car Show + Ride & Drive, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. September 14 in Winston-Salem, BB&T Field:  On Saturday, September 14 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., bring your plug-in vehicle to a driver meet-up, car show and ride and drive, which is open to the public. The vehicles will be located in the Gold Parking Lot across from Bridger Field House.

Register here.

Electric Vehicle Car Show + Ride & Drive on Thursday, September 19 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Join us for a car show and ride & drive at Venture Plaza on NC State University’s Centennial campus. For this lunchtime event, there will be food trucks, static EVs and PHEVs to look at as well as test-drive. If you are an owner, there will be room for up to 10 static vehicles for the static car show. Owners are also welcome to participate in the ride & drive portion of the event.

For those who just want to visit and are not part of the Centennial Campus community, pay public parking is available in front of the Hunt Library. This is the same venue as the spring 2019 Earth Day event and will be a similar setup. Come on out have lunch and learn about driving on electricity!

Register here.

Driver Meet-Up & Car Show on Friday, September 20 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.: Join us for a plug-in electric vehicle driver meet-up, car show, and ride & drive outside the Close-King Indoor practice facility at the corner of Westchase Boulevard and Peter Karmanos Jr. Drive, next to Carter Finley Stadium.  Bring your plug-in vehicle. Open to the public.

Register here.

Electric Vehicle Show & Tailgate on Saturday, September 21, time TBD: Join us for a tailgate and plug-in electric vehicle car show outside the Close-King Indoor practice facility at the corner of Westchase Boulevard and Peter Karmanos Jr. Drive, next to Carter-Finley Stadium. Come learn about electric, plug-in hybrid electric and hybrid electric vehicles, as well as register for a chance to win NC State University Football prizes!

(For game day on Saturday, due to congestion and traffic, if you do not have tickets for the game or parking arrangements, it is not advised that you come visit the plug-in electric vehicle show.)

Electric Vehicle Car Show at Pepperfest, Downtown Pittsboro, 3-6 p.m. Sunday, September 22: Join us at the 2019 Pepper Festival in Downtown Pittsboro to check out a display of plug-in electric and hybrid vehicles, and talk to us to learn more about them.

Learn more and find an event near you at www.DriveElectricWeek.org!

2019 National Drive Electric Week Events Coming Up in Raleigh

It’s National Drive Electric Week! Are you interested in learning more about electric and hybrid vehicles?

Join the NC Clean Energy Technology Center for National Drive Electric Week at NC State University in Raleigh, September 19-21!

Electric Vehicle Car Show + Ride & Drive on Thursday, September 19 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Join us for a car show and ride & drive at Venture Plaza on NC State University’s Centennial campus. For this lunchtime event, there will be food trucks, static EVs and PHEVs to look at as well as test drive. If you are an owner, there will be room for up to 10 static vehicles for the static car show. Owners are also welcome to participate in the ride & drive portion of the event. For those who just want to visit and are not part of the Centennial Campus community, pay public parking is available in front of the Hunt Library. This is the same venue as the spring 2019 Earth Day event and will be a similar setup. Come on out have lunch and learn about driving on electricity!

Register here.

 

Driver Meet-Up & Car Show on Friday, September 20 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.: Join us for a plug-in electric vehicle driver meet-up, car show, and ride & drive outside the Close-King Indoor practice facility at the corner of Westchase Boulevard and Peter Karmanos Jr. Drive, next to Carter Finley Stadium.  Bring your plug-in vehicle. Open to the public.

Register here.

 

Electric Vehicle Show & Tailgate on Saturday, September 21, time TBD: Join us for a tailgate and plug-in electric vehicle car show outside the Close-King Indoor practice facility at the corner of Westchase Boulevard and Peter Karmanos Jr. Drive, next to Carter-Finley Stadium. Come learn about electric, plug-in hybrid electric and hybrid electric vehicles, as well as register for a chance to win NC State University Football prizes!

*For game day on Saturday, due to the game day congestion and traffic, if you do not have tickets for the game or parking arrangements, it is not advised that you come visit the plug-in electric vehicle show.

 

Learn more at www.DriveElectricWeek.org!

Alternative Fuels for Fleets: Propane with The Produce Box

Considering alternative fuels for your fleet? Learn more about propane!

We visited The Produce Box site in Raleigh, North Carolina, last year and talked to Founder Courtney Tellefsen about their fleet of propane vehicles. Check out our new video on it here!

The Produce Box, a produce delivery company in North Carolina, serves about 11,000 families across the state. The company has eight propane trucks, which they said they chose because they burn cleaner and save $20-30K in fuel a year. Propane is also a domestic fuel, as 90 percent of it comes from the US.

Learn more about The Produce Box at www.theproducebox.com.

Learn more about propane and if this option could be right for your fleet at cleantransportation.org.

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