Tag Archives: green

Webinar: Top Three Green Fleet Award Winners 2018

Ron Wirth, Fleet Advance Planning and Sustainability Manager, Fleet Services Division, County of Sacramento, California (right) accepting the #1 winner award for the 2018 Green Fleet Awards at the Sustainable Technology Conference in Durham, NC on August 21, 2018. The award was presented by Tom C. Johnson (left), Author, The Green Fleet Awards.

 

***In case you missed it: the webinar is still viewable anytime for free here!***

Learn from the top 3 Green Fleet Award winners for 2018 out of a possible 38,000 public fleets in North America by tuning in to a free webinar, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, October 30.

Join us to get the straight story on the methods and technologies that work for the top Green Fleets! You will learn how the fleets were able to get funding for alternative fuel vehicles as well as the infrastructure to support them. They will also present the ROIs for their projects. These are tools, tips and strategies that you can use in your operation the next day.

Learn more about the Green Fleet Awards here, and register for the webinar here.

Learn about the top Green Fleet Award winners & webinar presenters:

SACRAMENTO COUNTY (#1) – Keith Leech Sr.

Keith Leech Sr. currently leads Sacramento County‘s Fleet Division and Parking Enterprise. The County of Sacramento is recognized as a trailblazer in implementing renewable fuels and innovative fleet technology projects driven by strategic business planning processes and data driven decisions.  Sacramento County’s fleet was recognized as the #1 Green Fleet in 2018 and among Government Fleet’s Leading Fleets and 100 Best Fleets for the last three consecutive years.  Keith was inducted into the Public Fleet Hall of Fame in 2017 by Government Fleet Magazine and APWA and received NAFA’s 2014 Fleet Excellence Awards for Excellence in Public Fleet Sustainability and Excellence in Fleet Leadership. Keith currently serves as Chairman of the Northern California Chapter of the Municipal Equipment Maintenance Association and NAFA’s Government Affairs Committee. He also serves as President of the Sacramento Clean Cities Coalition.

CITY OF SACRAMENTO (#2) – Mark Stevens

Mark Stevens has served as Fleet Manger for the City of Pompano Beach, FL; Asheville, NC; and the City of Sacramento, CA. He graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology. For 20 years at the City of Pompano Beach, FL, Mark established a state of the art Fleet Management operation comprising fleet operation software, fuel management software, and complete operational procedures. Customers included Police, Fire, Public Works, Utilities Parks & Recreation and assorted support divisions. As Fleet Manager with the City of Asheville, NC, Mark was instrumental in upgrading the city’s CNG public access fueling site as well as establish a time fill CNG station for the increased use of CNG for its Sanitation Department solid refuse fleet. He augmented the city’s alternative fuel vehicle program to help reduce the city’s overall carbon footprint. Currently, Mark is Fleet Manager of the City of Sacramento, committed to continuing the award winning Fleet model for #1 Best Government Fleet and #1 Green Fleets, committed to promote the city’s Sustainable Fleet initiatives.

DEKALB COUNTY, GEORGIA (#18/100 BEST FLEETS # 1 WINNER) – Robert Gordon

Robert Gordon, Fleet Director for Dekalb County, Georgia (left) receives his award as the #1 winner of The 100 Best Fleets in the Americas at the NAFA I&E Conference in Anaheim, California on April 27, 2018 from Tom C. Johnson, Author of The 100 Best Fleets contest (right). Photo credit: Ken Hunter, NAFA.

Robert Gordon is the Deputy Director of the Fleet Management Department for DeKalb County Georgia. He has 31 years of professional work experience in the Fleet Management industry with 17 years of government fleet experience and 14 years of experience with truck leasing organizations. Robert earned an Associate’s Degree in Business Management, a Certificate of Public Works Management and an Advanced Certificate of Public Works Management through the Carl Vinson Institute of Government at the University of Georgia. He graduated from DeKalb County Government’s Bright Futures Emerging Executive Leaders Program. He is on the board of directors for Clean Cities Georgia. DeKalb County Fleet Management has placed in the Top 10 of the 100 Best Fleet for the last 5 years. Under his direction, DeKalb County Fleet Management achieved 1st place in the 100 Best Fleet Award in 2018. Robert also received the 2018 FLEXY award for Outstanding Achievement in Public Fleet Management from NAFA Fleet Management Association. He serves on advisory committees at Georgia Piedmont Technical College, Warren Tech, Southern Crescent Tech, Whitfield County Career Academy, and Atlanta Metropolitan College. He is also an active member in many organizations including 100 Best Fleet, Green Fleet, NAFA, Georgia Motor Trucking Association, American Public Works Association, Georgia Municipal Association, Clean Cities Georgia, Southeast Diesel Collaborative, and Southeast Governmental Fleet Managers Association.

NCCETC Awards $1.1 million in Air Quality Improvement Grants

NCCETC Awards $1.1 million in Air Quality Improvement Grants

New round of funding released

Raleigh, N.C. (October 9, 2018) — The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center (NCCETC) at N.C. State University announced the results of a call for projects through the Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) Project. The 2017-2018 $5.6 million initiative, focused on reducing transportation-related emissions, is supported with federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality funding from the N.C. Department of Transportation (DOT). More than $1,100,101 is being awarded for ten projects to a variety of public and private entities.

Also, a new round of funding has been released, and the applications are due December 17, 2018.

The awards include:

  • Alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) lease and conversions by UNC Charlotte
  • Electric PTO (power take-off) bucket trucks by Viatec Incorporated and Town of Apex
  • AFV conversions to bi-fuel propane by City of Charlotte and thyssenkrupp
  • Diesel retrofit by North Carolina Department of Transportation Rail Division
  • Electric motorcycle leases by law enforcement in Davidson County, Orange County, and Town of Matthews

The CFAT project operates in counties that do not meet National Ambient Air Quality Standards. In total, the awarded equipment displaces 62,949 gallons of diesel/gas a year, reducing 54,042 kg of daily emissions.

The first round of 2019 funding Request for Proposals (RFP) period has opened and awards will be announced by February 2019.  In 2019, up to $2,350,000 in federal funding is being awarded. The 2019 funds will be awarded continuously, through three rounds of reviews and allocations, until all funds are allocated. The deadline to apply for the first round of funding is December 17, 2018. The application can be found here. For more information, click here.

The NCCETC has partnered with Triangle J, Centralina, Upper Coastal Plain and Kerr-Tar Councils of Governments, and the Piedmont Triad Regional Council to conduct education and outreach regarding alternative fuel and fuel conservation technologies and policies. Additional CFAT activities include a public education media campaign, an annual recognition of exemplary efforts to reduce transportation related emissions, and an annual Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference.

About the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center

The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University, advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, sustainable energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information about the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, visit: http://www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu.

Media Contact:

Media Contact: Shannon Helm, 919-423-8340, shannon_helm@ncsu.edu

2018 Mobile CARE and NC Smart Fleet Awards

The 12th annual North Carolina Mobile Clean Air Renewable Energy (CARE) awards and the NC Smart Fleet awards were announced as part of the 2018 Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo held at the Durham Convention Center in Durham, N.C. !

The Mobile CARE awards recognize transportation emission reduction efforts that are advancing alternative fuel and transportation technology activities in North Carolina. For Mobile CARE, candidates were sought in three main categories: Individual, Policy/Organization, and Fuel/Technology Providers.

This year, the judges selected Jason Wager, coordinator of the Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition (CCFC) for 18 years, for the Individual award; Town of Cary for the Policy/Organization award, and Novozymes for the Fuel/Technology Providers award.

Individual

Jason Wager, coordinator of the Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition (CCFC)

This award goes to an individual in North Carolina who-in both their professional and personal life- has worked to advance the adoption of sustainable transportation technologies and practices.

Jason Wager has been the coordinator of the Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition (CCFC) for 18 years. He provides leadership in the alternative fuels industry not only in the Charlotte region, but throughout the state and country. In North Carolina, Wager has been a long time education and outreach provider for the Clean Fuels Advanced Technology Program, a steering committee member for Plug-in NC and a member of NCSEA’s Electric Vehicle Working Group. He has organized countless educational activities related to clean transportation technologies in the Charlotte region. Nationally, Wager has served as a mentor to other Clean Cities coordinators and is a member of the Clean Cities Coordinator Council; these activities enable him to educate and assist new Clean Cities Coordinators.

Policy/Organization

Town of Cary

This award goes to a public or private organization that has created a policy that deserves to be held up as an example of a Best Practice that should be more widely adopted.

The Town of Cary first adopted a Strategic Energy Action Plan in 2012 and modified it in 2015. As one of the three focus areas for reducing energy use was fleet. The overall plan calls for reducing energy use by 13% by 2020. As part of their Strategic Energy Action Plan the town has created a Fleet Efficiency Standard Procedure, which puts in place standard procedures around purchasing more efficient vehicles, utilization of vehicles, driver training on how to drive more efficiently, route selection to reduce vehicle miles traveled, and mandated annual reporting. The Town of Cary has seen a 11% improvement in MPG across their fleet and a 17% reduction in vehicle miles traveled since implementing the standard procedures.

Fuel or Technology Provider

Novozymes

This award goes to a fuel or technology provider in the state of North Carolina that has worked to advance the adoption or availability of clean transportation technologies in the state.

With a headquarters in Franklinton, TN, Novozymes is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of enzymes that help break down organic matter into biofuels. Novozymes has committed to following the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Globally, Novozymes has committed to reducing their carbon footprint by 100 million tons by 2020; as of 2016 they were 69% of the way toward their target. Here in North Carolina, Novozymes has been consistently committed to supporting educational efforts that promote clean transportation technologies. They have helped support the Particle Falls exhibit, the alternative fuel tailgates, and have a long-standing relationship with NASCAR regarding education on ethanol.

N.C. Smart Fleet

N.C. Smart Fleet focuses on fleet commitment and accomplishments in reducing petroleum use, thus reducing CO2 emissions and other harmful emissions. North Carolina based fleets (both public and private sector) are recognized by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center as supporters, leaders or champions based on their sustainability practices.

The following organizations were recognized at the NC Smart Fleet awards event:

BuildSense
UNC Charlotte
Town of Cary
Orange County
NCDOT Rail Division
Epes Transport
City of Durham
City of Winston-Salem
Go Durham
City of Charlotte
Gaston County

Champions

NC Smart Fleet Champions: BuildSense; City of Charlotte; City of Durham; Epes Transport System LLC; NCDOT Rail Division; Orange County; Town of Cary; City of Raleigh; UNC Charlotte

NC Smart Fleet Champions have achieved the highest level of recognition that we offer. Through demonstrated emissions reductions, improvements in fuel economy, use of alternative fuel vehicles, and use of best practices, these fleets serve as examples for the rest of us.

  • BuildSense: BuildSense is a design-build general contractor with an emphasis on green-building in commercial and residential. Even among Champions, BuildSense stands out from the crowd with nearly 90% of their fleet being alt fueled, consuming almost 70% alternative fuel, including CNG, B100 biodiesel, and electricity. In 2018, they reduced their fuel use over 2017 consumption, and they burned only B100 in their biodiesel vehicles.
  • City of Charlotte: The City of Charlotte continues remarkable progress in interdepartmental collaboration and management of fleet data, which gives them extra leverage to reduce air pollution and improve fuel economy across City functions.  For the second year, their application includes Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department; City Fire Department; Solid Waste Services; Water; Department of Transportation; Engineering and Property Management; Housing and Neighborhood Services. Nearly 22% of their total fleet is alt-fueled, including 30% of their light-duty fleet.
  • City of Durham: In 2017 City of Durham engaged an array of efforts and policies to cut pollution and plan for fuel efficiency: They used GIS and telemetry data to scrutinize efficiencies, routes, and idling in Solid Waste. The City replaced a number of police cruisers with fuel efficiency as a criterion. The City made substantial facility improvements and started a new stringent right typing / rightsizing replacement program.
  • EPES Transport System, Inc.: This freight hauler continues to run both liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) trucks; and they continue to improve fuel economy through techniques such as monitoring tire pressure, mandating speed limits, purchasing trucks that are more aerodynamic, and using telematics. EPES continues testing several brands of trailer tails, and an electric APU device to further reduce fleet idling.
  • Town of Cary: Despite continued growth of population and demands for public services, Town of Cary continues to lead in purchasing high MPG vehicles, robust use of smart-fleet technologies, and exemplary policies to push their Championship status. In 2018 they significantly increased their alt-fueled share of total fleet to almost 5 and a half percent. The Town’s formal rules and guidance on clean transportation includes fuel efficiency, purchasing, right-sizing, and route-planning policies.
  • UNC Charlotte: UNC Charlotte’s steady Championship for clean transportation policies and practices shows in their 2018 application.  After last year’s surge in use of electric vehicles from 48 new charging stations, light rail entering campus, and a new bike-share system, this year UNC-C tracked reductions in both vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and fuel consumption.
  • NCDOT Rail Division: NCDOT Rail Division is a new member of NC Smart Fleet for 2018. They run 8 locomotives for passenger service between Raleigh and Charlotte, and they have a strong history of innovation in pollution reduction. Despite new routes and increased vehicle miles traveled due to growth of demand for their services, the Rail Division continues to lead in deploying emissions reduction technologies.
  • Orange County: Orange County has been diligently working to improve fuel economy and reduce transportation pollution for years. This year’s Championship application highlighted the more than 11% of their fleet being alt-fueled, including 23 hybrids and 15 bi-fuel propane vehicles. The County reports 100% of its diesel vehicles being equipped with particulate filters or other emission reduction equipment. The County also have an Annual Sustainability Report on fleet MPGs, their GHG emissions inventory is being updated to include fleet activities, and they are directly coordinating with departments to implement telematics systems and a CarShare program.

Leaders

NC Smart Fleet Leaders have demonstrated a commitment to improving the sustainability of their fleet and have implemented some clean transportation technologies and best practices in their fleets.

NC Smart Fleet Leaders: Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools; City of Winston-Salem; Durham City Transit Company (GoDurham); Gaston County; GoTriangle

  • City of Winston-Salem: City of Winston-Salem is a new addition to the NC Smart Fleet program, and they join by reporting almost 2% of their fleet is alt-fueled, including 1.8% of whole fleet, 2.6% of light-duty fleet, using electric, hybrid, & CNG technologies. W-S reports an impressive 1% reduction in vehicle miles traveled (VMT) from 2017 to 2018. This is a 141,000-mile reduction.
  • Charlotte-Mecklenberg School District Building Services Department: Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools showed continued leadership in clean transportation in a number of ways. They significantly added to their alt-fueled fleet, increasing their percentage from less than 1% to more than 3.5% of fleet, using both dedicated and bi-fuel Propane, and gas-electric hybrids. They continue to use technologies such as anti-idling, GPS, route planning, and driver prompts to remember MPGs and Eco Driving techniques.
  • Durham City Transit Company: Durham City Transit Company is a new addition to the NC Smart Fleet program, shining with more than 40% of their fleet being alt-fueled – 25 hybrid buses out of total fleet of 61.
  • Gaston County: Gaston County is also a new addition to the NC Smart Fleet program, joining with more than 13% of their total fleet being alt-fueled. Almost 32% of their medium duty fleet runs on propane with the option to run gasoline.
  • GoTriangle: GoTriangle is another new addition to the NC Smart Fleet program for 2018. This regional transit agency serves more than 1.7 million people per year and has noteworthy policies in regards to clean transportation. GoTriangle reports 100% of their fleet using particulate filters.

The Mobile CARE and NC Smart Fleet awards are given by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center with support by the N.C. Department of Transportation.

Upcoming Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo 2018

WHAT:  The Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo, organized by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center at N.C. State University and the N.C. Department of Transportation, offers this event for fleet managers and transportation-related decision-makers at organizations of all sizes.  The conference will showcase the latest on technologies in the biofuels, natural gas and propane arenas. There will also be a strong focus on data-driven decisions and technologies.

WHEN:   August 22: 8:30am – 6:00pm; Reception 6:00pm-7:30pm

August 23:  9:00am – 4:00pm; (2:30pm-4:00pm NC Smart Fleet Awards/Keynote)

WHERE: Durham Convention Center

301 West Morgan Street, Durham, NC 27701

WHO:  Keynote speakers include:

• Scott Curran, PhD, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

• Robert Gordon, DeKalb County, Georgia Government Fleet Management Department

• Tony Posawatz, automotive innovation leader

• Chris Werner, Director of Technical Services, NC Department of Transportation

Plenary panel speakers

Future of Sustainable Transportation

• LoreanaMarciante, Smart City Challenge Initiative

• Scott Phillippi, UPS Corporate Automotive Engineering

• Stuart Weidie, Alliance AutoGas

• Scott Curran, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

VW Settlement

• Michael Abraczinskas, NC Division of Air Quality

• Michael Buff, Electrify America

• Alexa Voytek, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s Office of Energy Programs

• Debbie Swartz, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)

• Joe Annotti, Glandstein, Neandross & Associates (moderator)

Over 50 speakers will present their expertise in Breakout Sessions with three tracks including Data & Solutions; Alternative Fuels & Advanced Technologies; Policy & Technology. View Agenda

Over 40 exhibitors will showcase products, services, and vehicles in the Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference Expo Hall. Vehicles on display will include plug-in and hybrid electric vehicles from Toyota, Mitsubishi, Chevy, and Chrysler. Other vehicles fueled by natural gas and propane will be displayed, including a heavy-duty Freightliner CNG trash roll-off hoist truck. View Exhibitor List

Advanced registration is required. Full details can be found at the conference web page:
https://www.sustainablefleetexpo.com/.

Posted by Nicole Deck

100 Best Fleets winners series – City of Durham

Fleet members of the City of Durham. Photo contributed by City of Durham.

This week, Fuel What Matters features 100 Best Fleets of the Americas winner City of Durham.

City of Durham’s fleet, which consists of about 1,520 vehicles and equipment, is a typical municipal fleet with cars and trucks (both light/heavy duty), refuse collection vehicles, police and fire vehicles, and construction equipment, according to Fleet Management Director Joseph Clark.

Durham has received the 100 Best Fleets Award every year since 2010, has been named as a Top 50 Fleet by the Leading Fleets Award Program from 2014 to 2018, and has multiple times been recognized for the Green Fleet Awards.

“We are proud to be afforded the opportunity to both participate and be recognized,” Clark said of the 100 Best Fleets award.  “Our highest ranking has been 7th, but we are optimistic for the future.”

Clark said he thinks the City of Durham fleet’s careful cost analyzation to determine what works well for the organization and its stakeholders is what the fleet does best.

Durham uses a  Fleet Information Management System that captures accurate relative data; and dealer and OEM level software and technician training.  The fleet also benchmarks other leading agencies in their successes and failures to minimize missteps and maximize returns; and uses optimized tuning equipment, advanced telematics and idle reduction technology to increase fleet efficiency.

“Our recognition is tied to our dedication to managing the fleet utilizing some of the best and latest tools available,” Clark said.

Durham also has plan in place with a goal of reducing annual maintenance cost and average cost per mile, increasing average fuel economy, and reducing fossil fuel consumption, Clark said.

Through the years, underutilized vehicles have been removed, allowing the fleet to decrease in size. Clark said this has been done by outsourcing police upfit builds, remarketing used vehicles within the City, and adopting a sustainability plan that includes fuel reduction goals, right-sizing and right-typing vehicles, utilizing smaller engines in police vehicles, eliminating 4-wheel drive when not needed, and more.

To keep improving on the City of Durham’s fleet, Clark said they hope to further invest in hybrid vehicles, along with continued investment in anti-idle technology.

In addition to reducing fossil fuel use and right-sizing vehicles, Durham’s fleet also implements programs for its staff.

The fleet holds monthly staff meetings where discussion is focused on topics that encompass the whole organization, Clark said. The City has a program called Idea Starter that encourages new ideas and has a pool of funds to contribute to selected ideas.

“Recognition is a key component that encourages ideas to be brought forward,” Clark said. “We push a continuous learning philosophy.”

Throughout the years, the fleet has also faced challenges. There was a period of time when economic factors forced underfunding of fleet replacement — a deficit that created a backlog of vehicles, Clark said. The fleet continues to try to remedy the backlog while investing new ideas when opportunities exist.

When it comes to advice, Clark suggests “buy-in from the top.”

“Buy-in from the top is paramount — if upper management does not support the idea, it will be difficult to be successful,” Clark said.

 

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