Tag Archives: biofuels

Sessions Announced for 2019 Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference

Electric Vehicles breakout session in 2018

 

Track A: Trends in Advanced Fuels and Fueling

Electric Vehicles

Propane

Biofuel Solutions

Natural Gas

 

Track B: Integrated Fleet Technology Solutions

Infrastructure & Intelligent Solutions

Telematics

Electrification & the Grid

Fleet Operations: Idle Reduction & more

 

Track C: Fleet Efficiency & Sustainability

Heavy Duty Vehicle Efficiency

Procurement Solutions

Rural Fleet Operations

Recruiting, Retention & Career Development

 

Plenary Panels

Fleets & Advanced Mobility Solutions

Planning for an Advanced Transportation Future

 

Keynote Speakers

David Dunn; CFM; Fleet & Facilities Management Division Manager, City of Orlando

Mark Smith; Technology Integration Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office

 

Stay tuned for more speakers to be announced soon!

Posted by Nicole Deck

Save the date: 2019 Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference

 

Save the date for the 3rd annual Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference, August 7 & 8, 2019 in Durham, NC! The conference provides an opportunity for fleets and transportation professionals to experience the latest vehicle technology, tools, and resources designed to increase efficiency and reduce emissions. The event will include keynote presentations, 50+ panelists, breakout sessions, indoor vehicle/equipment display, and plenty of networking opportunities. Pre-conference events will take place August 6, which will include the Green Fleet Awards Forum along with the NC Smart Fleet and Mobile Care Awards!

Register online now

Check out the Sponsor & Exhibitor Information Guide to learn more about options for exhibiting or sponsoring

Share your ideas for breakout session topics by responding to the Call for Presentations

Who should attend?
Public & Private Fleet Managers
Purchasing Officials
State Government Leaders
Municipal Government Officials
Non-Profit Stakeholders
Clean Cities Coalitions & Stakeholders
Alternative Fuel Trade Organizations
Sustainability Managers
Academic Leaders & Researchers

Attendees can learn & share about:
Alternative Fuels (including biofuels, CNG, electric, propane, renewable diesel)
Advanced Vehicle Technologies
Motor Fleet Management
Vehicle Sharing Technologies
Idle Reduction
Vehicle Right Sizing
Eco-Driving
Autonomous Vehicles & Future Technologies

Stay tuned for more updates! For more information, visit the website, and contact Allison Carr at akcarr@ncsu.edu or 919-515-9781 for any questions.

Posted by Nicole Deck

Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demonstration & NC State Tailgate

Last Friday and Saturday, the NC Clean Energy Technology Center’s Clean Transportation team ended National Drive Electric Week with an Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demonstration & Tailgate for the NC State vs. Virginia Cavaliers football game.

The event began Friday, Sept. 28 with a driver meet-up and car show. There were about 20 plug-in electric, hybrid and biofuel vehicles on display, both from local dealerships and from electric vehicle owners and enthusiasts, including several Tesla models, BMWs, Mitsubishi, Chevrolet, Chrysler, Toyota and more.

Owners enjoyed showing off their vehicles to guests who were curious to learn more about them, and the Clean Transportation team were able to answer questions and hand out fact sheets and studies done by the Center.

There was even a Tesla Model X that did a dance!

 

Saturday was the NC State game outside of the Close-King Indoor Practice Facility where many of the same alternative vehicles were on display for guests to look at inside and out. Nissan representatives were also on site and guests played the “Run the Route Challenge” and the “Blind Spot Challenge.”

Posted by Nicole Deck

Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo 2018

Industry experts discuss the present and future of alternative fuel vehicles

Allison Carr, Clean Transportation Specialist at NCCETC, talks about the 50 States of EVs reports.

Fleet industry professionals, alternative vehicle experts, and sustainability advocates from around the country gathered recently for the 2018 Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo in Durham, NC.

More than 50 speakers presented their practices and ideas at the two-day conference, including fleet managers, technicians, company presidents and CEOs, university professors, researchers, analysts, nonprofit managers and more. With all of the varying backgrounds in transportation, there seemed to be a definitive consensus on alternative fuels – whether electric, propane, biofuel or natural gas – the industry is moving forward, and the future looks bright.

“The electrification movement and the movement to diversify our source of fuels – it’s happening. There’s no point of return now,” said Tony Posawatz,  industry leader and keynote speaker on day one of the conference. “The costs are coming down; the ecosystem is being built. But it will take some time.”

Tony Posawatz, the keynote speaker on day one of the Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference.

Keynote speaker Posawatz; who is recognized as an industry leader in product innovation and electrified vehicles as Vehicle Line Executive/Director for the Chevrolet Volt (and founding member), Avalanche, and Cadillac Escalade; kicked off the conference on Wednesday morning.

Posowatz noted the alternative fuel market has steadily risen each year, and more and more choices have become available to consumers.

“It’s important for the industry to grow and for customers to be satisfied,” Posawatz said.

“The Triangle Research area is an important area for taking transportation where it needs to go,” Posowatz said. “It’s an area for emerging technology, automobile, mobility as well as energy and environment altogether.”

Posawatz noted that while the industry is obviously improving, it’s still impossible to predict.

“The future of mobility is before us,” Posawatz said. “It will surprise us all, even myself. Anyone who tells you they know what it will look like… they’re wrong.”

Panelists speak at the Electric Vehicles breakout session, including Christopher Facente, Fleet Manager at UNC-Charlotte; Ben Prochazka, Vice President of Electrification Coalition; Jesse Way, Climate Policy Analyst, Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM); Mark Goody, Manager of Electric Vehicle Programs at FleetCarma; and Whitney Schmidt, EV Charging Sales Director, Carolinas and Tennessee, ChargePoint.

The three conference tracks included Connected Fleets, Alternative Fuel Solutions, Deployment and Lessons Learned, while 12 breakout sessions covered Predictive Analytics; Electric Vehicles; Solutions for Port & Freight; Smart Mobility; Propane; Local, State, Federal Policies & Resources; Managing for Fleet Efficiency; Biofuels; Sustainable Garage & Facility Operations; Smart Cities & Smart Grid; Natural Gas; and Idle Reduction.

Future of Sustainability panel, left to right: Tony Posawatz, Stuart Weidie, CEO of Alliance AutoGas; Scott Phillippi, Automotive Maintenance and Engineering Manager at UPS; Loreana Marciante, Low Carbon Mobility Strategy Manager at Paul Allen Philanthropies; and Scott Curran, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

The first plenary panel, Future of Sustainability, featured Stuart Weidie, CEO of Alliance AutoGas; Loreana Marciante, Low Carbon Mobility Strategy Manager at Paul Allen Philanthropies; Scott Phillippi, Automotive Maintenance and Engineering Manager at UPS; and Scott Curran, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Phillipi compared the current state of the industry as a ‘big sandbox with a lot of different technologies.’

“We’re in a time in technology where perfect is a moving target,” said Phillippi. “As technology evolves, we may find that different things come to the forefront.”

While the plenary panel all came from different backgrounds, they agreed each alternative fuel and technology has its place and application.

“We’re seeing change happen more rapidly,” said Rick Sapienza of NCCETC. “There’s not one set solution. Use all the tools available to you.”

VW Settlement Plenary Panel, left to right: Michael Abraczinskas, Director, NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NCDEQ); Alexa Voytek, Senior Program Manager of Office of Energy Programs at Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation (TDEQ); Joe Annotti, Gladstein, Neandross & Associates (GNA); Debra Swartz, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; and and Michael Buff, infrastructure team, Electrify America.

At the VW Settlement Plenary Panel, Michael Buff of Electrify America; Michael Abraczinskas of NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NCDEQ); Alexa Voytek of Office of Energy Programs at Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation (TDEQ); and Debra Swartz, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; discussed settlement funds coming from Volkswagen.

Over 40 exhibitors showcased their products, services, and vehicles in the Expo Hall. Plug-in and hybrid electric vehicles from Toyota, Mitsubishi, Chevy, and Chrysler were on display, as well as other vehicles fueled by natural gas and propane, including a heavy-duty Freightliner CNG trash roll-off hoist truck.

 

“The conference was a great success,” said Rick Sapienza, Clean Transportation Director at NCCETC. ” It brought together transportation professionals to exchange ideas on clean transportation technologies with a good mix of what is working today, and strategic thought-provoking discussion to consider and prepare for what might be coming tomorrow.”

“As we deploy new technologies and new companies come on board, the one thing that is certain is there are going to be bumps along the way,” Phillippi said. “This is not going to be easy, but it will be worth the effort.”

Upcoming Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo 2018

WHAT:  The Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference & Expo, organized by the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center at N.C. State University and the N.C. Department of Transportation, offers this event for fleet managers and transportation-related decision-makers at organizations of all sizes.  The conference will showcase the latest on technologies in the biofuels, natural gas and propane arenas. There will also be a strong focus on data-driven decisions and technologies.

WHEN:   August 22: 8:30am – 6:00pm; Reception 6:00pm-7:30pm

August 23:  9:00am – 4:00pm; (2:30pm-4:00pm NC Smart Fleet Awards/Keynote)

WHERE: Durham Convention Center

301 West Morgan Street, Durham, NC 27701

WHO:  Keynote speakers include:

• Scott Curran, PhD, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

• Robert Gordon, DeKalb County, Georgia Government Fleet Management Department

• Tony Posawatz, automotive innovation leader

• Chris Werner, Director of Technical Services, NC Department of Transportation

Plenary panel speakers

Future of Sustainable Transportation

• LoreanaMarciante, Smart City Challenge Initiative

• Scott Phillippi, UPS Corporate Automotive Engineering

• Stuart Weidie, Alliance AutoGas

• Scott Curran, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

VW Settlement

• Michael Abraczinskas, NC Division of Air Quality

• Michael Buff, Electrify America

• Alexa Voytek, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s Office of Energy Programs

• Debbie Swartz, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)

• Joe Annotti, Glandstein, Neandross & Associates (moderator)

Over 50 speakers will present their expertise in Breakout Sessions with three tracks including Data & Solutions; Alternative Fuels & Advanced Technologies; Policy & Technology. View Agenda

Over 40 exhibitors will showcase products, services, and vehicles in the Sustainable Fleet Technology Conference Expo Hall. Vehicles on display will include plug-in and hybrid electric vehicles from Toyota, Mitsubishi, Chevy, and Chrysler. Other vehicles fueled by natural gas and propane will be displayed, including a heavy-duty Freightliner CNG trash roll-off hoist truck. View Exhibitor List

Advanced registration is required. Full details can be found at the conference web page:
https://www.sustainablefleetexpo.com/.

Posted by Nicole Deck

100 Best Fleets – City of Raleigh

https://www.raleighnc.gov/home/content/AdminServSustain/Articles/AltFuelProgram.html
City of Raleigh Prius vehicles charging up. Courtesy: www.raleighnc.gov

The City of Raleigh has more than 2,000 registered vehicles in its fleet used for a wide variety of services, including the police force, garbage, maintenance and repairs, public utilities, water and sewer and more, according to Fleet Services Superintendent Travis Brown.

Along with the wide range of vehicles, Raleigh also has a large number of alternative fuels and alternative vehicles to match.

The City, which isn’t new to the 100 Best Fleets list, uses 385 vehicles with B20 biodiesel, over 1,000 E85 flex fuel-compatible vehicles, 223 hybrids, 18 electric powered neighborhood vehicles,  25 vehicles that use propane, and 7 that use natural gas.

Brown, who has worked with the City of Raleigh for 16 years, said the City has been working to transform the fleet even before he arrived, when the City was already using biodiesel.

Brown said that so many alternative fuels have been introduced into the fleet because they help to reduce emissions, improve air quality, promote domestic energy production, help decrease fuel costs, and can help farmers.

The goal of the City is to take care of its citizens, Brown said – and using alternative fuels is a part of that.

“It’s about being a good steward of a city, and trying to do the right thing,” Brown said.

Raleigh also uses anti-idling technology in many of the police fleet vehicles. The Energy Xtreme Law Enforcement anti-idling system allows vehicles to operate their full electrical system (including lights, camera and radio) without using the vehicle’s engine, according to the City of Raleigh website.

After the first quarter of the anti-idling technology usage, about 962 gallons were saved from 29 vehicles that used it, according to the website. The projected annual savings were estimated at $63,199.

Previously, many City police vehicles were driving Ford Crown Victorias, and now they’re driving hybrid sedans – which Brown said saves a lot of money when it comes to fuel. The Crown Victorias were getting around 13-18 miles per gallon (MPG), he said, and the hybrids get around 30-38 MPG.

“It’s been a good investment on return, going that way,” Brown said.

In addition to alternative fuels, the City schedules vehicle replacements every year to ensure the fleet is kept modern.

Raleigh also uses a maintenance management system, which provides GPS information for departments on engine faults, idling, equipment and accountability.

The most challenging part of managing a fleet, Brown said, is communicating and educating – getting the word out to all staff about changes and plans, and educating on new ways of doing things and how those changes are beneficial.

Brown said he addresses it as much as he can by having meetings with service departments and providing data on fuel usage.

When running a fleet, Brown advises doing research, networking with those in the same industry to see what works for their fleet, looking at your own to figure out what could work for yours, and attempting to do some forecasting.

“There’s so much technology out there, and the automotive industry is changing so much,” Brown said. “Don’t look at necessarily what’s happening today – try to find what’s coming up three years down the road. You don’t want to get something approved, and then it’s outdated.”

Looking ahead, Brown said Raleigh hopes to push more telematics, eventually adding the technology to all vehicles being used. Currently, Raleigh uses a maintenance management system, but the City would like to upgrade to a web-based system so they can provide more transparency to users and customers.

Learn more about the City of Raleigh’s alternative fuel use by visiting the website here.

Posted by NC Clean Energy Technology Center

Everyone can take steps to reduce vehicle pollution

Pollution from vehicles is a major cause of health problems such as asthma. We all benefit from clean air. No matter who you are, there are actions you can take to help reduce the amount of pollution that comes from cars. Everyone, from kids to adults, can help make a difference. Here are some things that you can do.

    1. 1. Ride a bike or walk.

If you are only going a short distance, consider riding a bike or walking instead of driving. You can get exercise and enjoy the fresh air while getting where you need to go!

2. Take public transit.
If you need to go somewhere that is along a bus or light rail line, consider taking public transit instead of going in a car.

3. Carpool.
When going to school or work, try to carpool together with other people who are headed in the same direction. You can save money and reduce the amount of fuel burned at the same time.

4. Avoid idling.
When idling, you waste fuel by burning it when you aren’t moving. If you will be in the same spot for more than a minute or two, consider turning off your vehicle’s engine (as long as it is safe to do so).

5. Use alternative fuels.
Alternative fuels are cleaner than regular gasoline or diesel. Alternative fuel vehicles include electric vehicles and flex-fuel vehicles that can use ethanol blends. Most new electric vehicles now have a range of over 100 miles, which meets most people’s daily commuting needs. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and extended range electric vehicles use gasoline as well and therefore do not have a range limit. Flex-fuel vehicles can use ethanol blends that are up to 85% ethanol and regular cars that are newer than 2001 can use ethanol blends that have up to 15% ethanol. Ethanol is made from crops such as corn and helps support American farmers.

None of these options work for everyone all the time. But all of us can take steps to reduce pollution from cars and trucks.

Posted by Growth Energy

E15 ethanol blend available for the Fall

As summer comes to a close, American drivers now have access to E15 – a 21st century fueling option that contains five percent more ethanol than what most drivers have been using for years. That’s good news for drivers and for our environment.

Virtually all gasoline used in the United States contains ten percent ethanol, something that has been true for years. This biofuel replaces toxic fuel additives that are linked to cancer and smog. And today, 29 states offer fuel with higher blends of ethanol, including E15.

By using more ethanol in our fuel supply, we have the ability to more fully realize the benefits of this American-made fuel source.

What are these benefits? Well, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has found that ethanol can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 43 percent or more when compared to petroleum. Not only that, it is more affordable, renewable and it’s home-grown – keeping prices low at the pump while simultaneously supporting jobs right here in the United States.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approves E15 for use in any vehicle manufactured since 2001, which equates to 9 out of 10 cars on the road today.

E15 is currently sold at more than 950 retail outlets across 29 states – and that number grows every day. So, next time you fill up, choose E15 as a cleaner, modern fuel option. In our book, it’s definitely a fuel that matters.

To find an E15 retailer near you and learn more about this 21st century fuel choice, visit GetEthanol.com on your computer or mobile device.

Posted by Growth Energy

Americans Have Driven More Than 1 Billion Miles on E15

American consumers have helped E15 – a fuel containing 15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline – reach a significant milestone. According to Growth Energy’s ongoing analysis of fuel sales and consumption data reported by major gasoline retailers, drivers across the United States have logged more than 1 billion miles on E15 – attesting to the fuel’s performance, safety, and value.

“American drivers are taking advantage of the proven performance, environmental benefits, and savings E15 provides,” said Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor.

Growth Energy is proud to celebrate this milestone and highlight the value E15 delivers in terms of better performance, reduction of toxic emissions, and savings at the pump. Today, E15 is sold at more than 800 retail outlets across 29 states, and its availability continues to grow each day because 21st century drivers are demanding 21st century fuels. You can find places to purchase ethanol at www.GetEthanol.com.

The EPA approves E15 for use in any vehicle manufactured since 2001, which equates to 9 out of 10 cars on the road today. Automakers also approve E15 for use in nearly three-quarters of new cars.

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